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E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

December, 2016

A sincere thank you goes to all who supported us in our Remembering Ruthie fundraising campaign. We know there are a lot of non-profits asking for your help this time of year, and we sincerely appreciate all donations made to help protect children at summer camps and day care centers by supplying them with EpiPens to use in an emergency. But it’s never too late to donate! Simply click on the Remembering Ruthie link on our website, allergyadovcacyassociation.org, or mail a check to:

Allergy Advocacy Association
97 Bev Circle
Brockport, NY 14420

On behalf of the children in our community, we thank you!

Concerned about foods that might contain allergens when you are dining out, visiting friends and relatives or looking for a safe snack? The Safe Snack Guide is a great resource for finding allergy safe holiday snacks and treats.

As we make our plans and set our goals for the New Year, we would love to hear your thoughts on how we're doing, as well as your suggestions for services we can provide to help keep everyone safe. Feel free to drop us a This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or post something on our Facebook page.

We wish you and yours much happiness and good health for the holiday season!  

Big Jon's Holiday Gratitude List

As we wind up yet another year, it’s the perfect time to sit back and reflect on all that has been accomplished in 2016. But of course nothing would have been possible without the hard work and support we receive every day from so many in our community. Here’s our founder Jon Terry’s list of people and organizations that have been especially helpful this past year in reaching our ongoing vision of “Not another life lost to anaphylaxis - not another life lost ANY life-threatening allergies!”

Big Jon's Allergy Advocacy Association Holiday Gratitude List

Xmas Saying From Da Grinch 2016

By Jon Terry
December 7, 2016

Happy Holidays! I sincerely hope all of our readers have had a great year and are looking forward to 2017. At this particular time of year it is a regular occurrence for individuals and organizations to offer up gratitude lists of various sorts. Most lists recount events from the past year that were particularly hopeful or meaningful. That is pretty much what I want to share with all the supporters and affiliates of the Allergy Advocacy Association. I firmly believe that we do have a lot to feel grateful about. Please see my “thank you” list below.

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Young Children With Food Allergies Are More Likely to Develop Asthma or Rhinitis

FARE logo

Young Children With Food Allergies Are More Likely to Develop Asthma or Rhinitis

Introduction

Researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have found an unfortunate connection between children with food allergies and those who develop respiratory allergies during the first five years of life. They found the odds of developing asthma or rhinitis were more than two times greater for food allergy patients than for patients who did not have a food allergy. Also, other studies have reported that about one-third of children with moderate to severe eczema have well-documented food allergies.

Perhaps this knowledge will help lead to answers in the future regarding causes and treatments for allergies of all types.

November 7th, 2016

A recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics (August 2016) reports that young children diagnosed with food allergy are at increased risk of also developing respiratory allergies during the first five years of life. This finding comes from reviewing the electronic medical records of children who received care from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) clinical network. Previous studies have suggested a similar association between food allergies and other allergic conditions, but those studies were smaller, less comprehensive, or based on participant reporting.

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Many Families In The Dark About Cheaper EpiPen Alternative

Did you know there is a less expensive alternative to Mylan’s EpiPen? A generic epinephrine auto injector of another brand called the Adrenaclick, it has been on the market since 2013. The cash price is as much as $430 cheaper than the EpiPen. But it’s important that your doctor write the prescription in a certain way or the pharmacist won’t be able to fill it with the less expensive brand. The prescription should say “‘the generic epinephrine auto injector,” not “EpiPen or generic equivalent.”

Generic Epinephrine Injector USP packages

Many Families In The Dark About Cheaper EpiPen Alternative

By Dr. Mallika Marshall
November 16th, 2016

BOSTON – Diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy, one wrong bite could be deadly for 10-year-old Dylan Frazier of Duxbury. That’s why his mom, Kristen, keeps EpiPens everywhere. “We keep one in the cafeteria. We also keep one in the classroom and in the sports bag,” she said.

The Fraziers’ insurance doesn’t cover the cost of all those extras, so they end up with hundreds of dollars in out-of-pocket costs just have that peace of mind.

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School Staff Know More Than They Think They Do About Treating Anaphylaxis

In a recent study in Colorado, non-nurse school staff was asked how confident they felt about recognizing and treating the symptoms of anaphylaxis. Only 18% felt very confident in their ability to recognize and treat a severe allergic reaction, but when asked to complete a survey, the staff members were able to answer correctly about 72 percent of 12 knowledge-based questions, and 87 percent were able to identify the correct sequence of actions to take. Let’s hope this holds true in school districts throughout the country and that even more school personnel can be trained.

School Staff Know More Than They Think They Do About Treating Anaphylaxis

Kids with Food Allergies Foundation logo

November 11th, 2016

Study shows 87 percent knew what to do in an emergency

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (November 11, 2016) – A study being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting found only 18 percent of non-nurse school staff surveyed felt very confident in their ability to recognize anaphylaxis symptoms. “Even though most of the non-nurse school staff weren’t confident in their ability to recognize and treat a severe allergic reaction, the staff members were able to answer correctly, on average, 72 percent of the 12 knowledge-based questions in the survey,” said allergist Angela Tsuang, MD, MSc, ACAAI member and lead study author. “In addition, 87 percent were able to identify the correct sequence of actions to take if a child is experiencing anaphylaxis. This tells us the majority of non-nurse staff know what to do in an allergic reaction emergency, and we should train a broader range of staff to increase confidence in these skills.”

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