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Lawmakers Say Mylan Stonewalling Them

Lawmakers Say Mylan Stonewalling Them

Mylan remains on the hot seat as members of Congress become increasingly frustrated with the delay in obtaining requested documents. If Mylan does not provide the unedited information by Feb. 28, 2017, Congress has the right to subpoena them. The company has already agreed to pay the federal government $465 million to settle claims that it overcharged Medicaid for the EpiPen.

Mylan CEO Heather Bresch with arm raised for 'sworn' testimony
Mylan CEO Heather Bresch

By Robert King
February 2nd, 2017

Two high-ranking members of Congress are clamoring for drug maker Mylan to produce documents about its controversial 400 percent price hike of the EpiPen.

Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Md., sent a letter Friday to Mylan, saying that the company hasn't produced enough documents "despite repeated requests." Chaffetz is chairman and Cummings the top Democrat of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which held a hearing on Mylan last year.

The committee has been investigating Mylan's decision to raise the price of the EpiPen by 400 percent since acquiring the allergy drug in 2007, increasing the price to $600 for a two-pack. The committee grilled CEO Heather Bresch last year over the increase.

After that hearing, the lawmakers said they wanted more information from Mylan about the decision.

However, it appears that Mylan hasn't fulfilled that request to their satisfaction.

"To date, Mylan has only produced a limited subset of these documents, with significant redactions," the letter said.

The lawmakers have a new deadline of Feb. 28 to produce unredacted documents to the committee. If Mylan doesn't meet that deadline, the lawmakers threaten they could subpoena them.

Mylan also has stonewalled the committee on information about its Medicaid rebate payments, "despite repeated requests that you prioritize this information," the letter says.

Mylan reached a settlement with the federal government to pay $465 million to settle claims that it overcharged Medicaid for the EpiPen. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have sought more information from the Justice Department and Mylan on the settlement, questioning if it went far enough.

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