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Parents View New Peanut Guidelines with Guilt and Skepticism

Parents View New Peanut Guidelines with Guilt and Skepticism

With the start of 2017 the news media has been full of articles reporting the new guidelines, issued by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recommend giving babies puréed food or finger food containing peanut powder or extract before they are 6 months old, and even earlier if a child is prone to allergies and doctors say it is safe to do so. However, many parents of peanut allergic children remain very skeptical.

PeanutButter Sandwich With Glass Of Chocolat Milk
Credit Philip Greenberg for The New York Times

By Roni Caryn Rabin and Rachel Rabkin Peachman
January 12th, 2017

When Nicole Lepke’s son was born, she listened to her pediatrician and kept peanuts away until the age of 2, but the toddler still developed a severe peanut allergy when he finally tried them.

Now, 12 years later, health experts have reversed their advice on peanuts, urging parents to begin feeding foods containing peanut powder or extract during infancy in hopes of reducing a child’s risk for allergy.

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The Bursting Reality of Latex Allergies

The Bursting Reality of Latex Allergies

Despite the relatively small number of people in America at risk, the prevalence, and severity, of latex allergies has been growing steadily for several years. While changes have been made overtime to remove latex products from public places including hospitals, many individuals are unaware of just how common the material is.

For an informative overview of the current situation, please read “10 Teachers Share How They Really Feel About Your Kids’ Allergies.”

Latex Allergy Warning Sign

Sarah Bedford, Editor-in-Chief
The Wilkes Beacon
January 3, 2017

Arachnophobia. Ophidiophobia. Acrophobia. These are the some of the most common fears people have. But for a Wilkes University sophomore, the thing that scares her most is the sound of balloons being inflated.

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School Staff Know More Than They Think They Do About Treating Anaphylaxis

In a recent study in Colorado, non-nurse school staff was asked how confident they felt about recognizing and treating the symptoms of anaphylaxis. Only 18% felt very confident in their ability to recognize and treat a severe allergic reaction, but when asked to complete a survey, the staff members were able to answer correctly about 72 percent of 12 knowledge-based questions, and 87 percent were able to identify the correct sequence of actions to take. Let’s hope this holds true in school districts throughout the country and that even more school personnel can be trained.

School Staff Know More Than They Think They Do About Treating Anaphylaxis

Kids with Food Allergies Foundation logo

November 11th, 2016

Study shows 87 percent knew what to do in an emergency

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (November 11, 2016) – A study being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting found only 18 percent of non-nurse school staff surveyed felt very confident in their ability to recognize anaphylaxis symptoms. “Even though most of the non-nurse school staff weren’t confident in their ability to recognize and treat a severe allergic reaction, the staff members were able to answer correctly, on average, 72 percent of the 12 knowledge-based questions in the survey,” said allergist Angela Tsuang, MD, MSc, ACAAI member and lead study author. “In addition, 87 percent were able to identify the correct sequence of actions to take if a child is experiencing anaphylaxis. This tells us the majority of non-nurse staff know what to do in an allergic reaction emergency, and we should train a broader range of staff to increase confidence in these skills.”

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Young Children With Food Allergies Are More Likely to Develop Asthma or Rhinitis

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Young Children With Food Allergies Are More Likely to Develop Asthma or Rhinitis

Introduction

Researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have found an unfortunate connection between children with food allergies and those who develop respiratory allergies during the first five years of life. They found the odds of developing asthma or rhinitis were more than two times greater for food allergy patients than for patients who did not have a food allergy. Also, other studies have reported that about one-third of children with moderate to severe eczema have well-documented food allergies.

Perhaps this knowledge will help lead to answers in the future regarding causes and treatments for allergies of all types.

November 7th, 2016

A recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics (August 2016) reports that young children diagnosed with food allergy are at increased risk of also developing respiratory allergies during the first five years of life. This finding comes from reviewing the electronic medical records of children who received care from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) clinical network. Previous studies have suggested a similar association between food allergies and other allergic conditions, but those studies were smaller, less comprehensive, or based on participant reporting.

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Check and Inject Program Final Report

We have an important update on the Check & Inject NY project where EMTs are trained to use a syringe rather than the more expensive epi-pen to administer epinephrine. The final report of the trial program found “a significant increase in understanding of anaphylaxis and the role of epinephrine.” With 500 agencies now enrolled, cost savings are projected to be over $400,000 per year. The State Emergency Medical Advisory Committee has approved the project and it is just waiting for final approval from the state health commissioner.

Check and Injest Training Kit

NYS EMS Awaits Decision by Health Commissioner

By Janet Goldman
October 12, 2016

Efficient, effective and economical! With New York State’s Check and Inject Program, Dr. Jeremy Cushman, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Physician and Medical Director for the Monroe Livingston Region, has demonstrated how ambulances can efficiently and effectively meet the needs of those with severe allergies. With special training procedures, this demonstration program has shown the benefits of enabling emergency medical technicians (EMTs) to administer epinephrine with a special syringe instead of an epinephrine auto injector (EAI).

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