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A Message from FARE CEO Dr. Jim Baker

We were sad to learn that Dr. Jim Baker will be resigning his position as CEO of FARE. This is the perfect time to look back on all that has been accomplished during his tenure and to pledge to help carry on the organization’s life-saving work. As just one example, FARE was one of the lead sponsors of the landmark research study which led to the development of new early feeding guidelines issued by the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases.

FARE CEO Dr. Jim Baker

A Message from FARE CEO Dr. Jim Baker

Dear Friends of FARE,

I first arrived at FARE as interim CEO and Chief Medical Officer early in the summer of 2014, having been asked to temporarily lead the organization through a transition period. I expected to stay less than six months, but have been at the helm of this remarkable organization for what will soon be four years. The time has now come when I feel comfortable stepping aside as FARE moves onto a new chapter, and today I am announcing my resignation.

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Putting an End to Allergic Reactions

Exciting new research comes to us from Aarhus University in Denmark where researchers were able to identify unique mechanisms of an antibody that blocks the immune effect behind allergic reactions.

The antibody interacts in the body to prevent the human allergy antibody from attaching to cells, thus keeping all allergic symptoms from occurring.

This could result in completely new strategies for engineering medicine of the future.

Edzard Spillner In Research Lab
Researchers have discovered a new approach for antibody-based treatment of allergy and asthma. It is nothing less than a breakthrough that could have a major impact on development of new medicine in years to come. The photo shows Edzard Spillner in the foreground.
Credit: (Photo: Lars Kruse)

Putting an End to Allergic Reactions
Newly Found Mechanism Could Pave the Way

Date: January 25, 2018
Source: Aarhus University

Researchers have found a new mechanism in which an antibody can prevent allergic reactions in a broad range of patients. The breakthrough could pave the way for a far more effective allergy medicine.

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University of Rochester Medical Center researcher asks: Why don't Mennonites get Allergies?

We have been touting the research efforts of the University of Rochester Medical Center in previous issues of our e-newsletter and on our Web site. The leader of this particular project, Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo MD, discusses the ways and means of she is using to better understand the development of life-threatening allergies in America.

Mennonite kids in field

University of Rochester Medical Center researcher asks: Why don't Mennonites get Allergies?

By Justin Murphy
November 20th, 2017

Old Order Mennonites sacrifice a lot of 21st century conveniences: electricity, motorized vehicles, modern dress and entertainment. One thing they don't need to worry about, though, is peanut allergies.

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Read Candy Labels to Keep Your Sweetheart Safe

You may think a particular brand of candy is safe to eat by checking the ingredients. But you also need to look for warnings that the candy may be manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat and soy. It’s always best to tell your child with allergies not to eat anything unless you can inspect it first. Here’s a list of popular Valentine candies that may contain allergens or have product advisories:

Valentine Heart Candy

Read Candy Labels to Keep Your Sweetheart Safe

Kids With Food Allergies
February 9th, 2018

Around Valentine's Day, others may offer candy or treats to your child with food allergies. Make sure your child knows not to accept or eat any candy unless a parent or trusted adult has verified that it is safe to eat. Many candies look alike but can have different ingredients and advisory warnings. Many smaller candies are sold in larger packages and do not have an ingredient label on the individual pieces.

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Food Allergy Research and Education 20th Anniversary Ball

Allergy Advocacy Association creative director Toni Taylor attended the FARE gala fundraiser in early December.

FARE 20th Anniversary Food Allergy Ball Sign

Food Allergy Research and Education 20th Anniversary Ball

By Toni Taylor
December 4th, 2017

It started in 1998 with a proclamation by President Bill Clinton starting Food Allergy Week in May of 2000. From this auspicious beginning Food Allergies Research and Education has grown into a global leader of food allergy research and advocacy. FARE strives to set priorities in food allergy research and advocacy that are supportive to all who work in the allergy community.

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