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A New Beginning in New York State

With the changes in New York State leadership, it is a good time to reflect on our legislative accomplishments over the past ten years and the future for other potential opportunities. Working with activists, medical professionals and legislators and their staff, the Allergy Advocacy Association has helped create a positive change for those suffering from life threatening allergies. We look forward to even more progress in the years to come.

Albany NY skyline illustration

August 19th, 2021
By Jon Terry

Dear friends;

Greetings from Brockport. I sincerely hope all readers of our monthly e-newsletter have had a safe and healthy summer.

Now that a new state governor is taking over in Albany, I think it’s a good time to review legislative achievements of activist advocates on behalf of individuals at risk for anaphylaxis and families dealing with life-threatening allergies.

During the last 10 years in NYS, the governor has signed into law five very important bills.

    1. The Nurse Authorized Stock Epinephrine Act.
      This law authorizes public central schools the ability to obtain a non-patient prescription so they can possess and administer epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) devices in anaphylaxis emergency situations.
      NASE has been enacted in 47 states across America, including NY. According to data from the America Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, in just a few years after enactment, NASE has saved THOUSANDS of lives in central school districts all across our country.1

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Researcher Wins Grant to Study Impact of Maternal Antibody on Development of Food Allergies in Infants

When it comes to food allergies, what does a mother pass on to her child? Food allergies are a major cause of neonatal morbidity. And food allergies also significantly affect young infants.

Kang Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Wayne State University School of Medicine has been awarded a $1.93 million, five-year grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to look at this issue.

Researcher Wins Grant to Study Impact of Maternal Antibody on Development of Food Allergies in Infants

Smiling mom and baby boy

News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release
-2021/08/10

DETROIT — A Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher has been awarded a $1.93 million, five-year grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the impact of maternal immunoglobulin D (IgD) transferred to the fetus during pregnancy and its impact on protecting against food allergies.

Chen Kang
Kang Chen

Kang Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology will use the grant, “Mechanism and function of transplacental IgD,” to tackle early infant morbidity due to increasing incidences of food allergies.

IgD is an antibody isotype present in the blood and tissue fluids, including human respiratory mucosa. Chen discovered that IgD is important in respiratory immune defense by inhibiting mucosal adhesion of pathogens and activating antimicrobial and immune-amplifying functions of basophils. IgD activation of basophils also suppresses Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic functions, and increased food allergen-specific IgD production correlates with protection against food allergy after oral immunotherapy in children. Maternal tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (TDaP) vaccine and food exposure in pregnancy induces the production of vaccine- and food-specific IgD, which is transferred across the placenta to the fetus in humans and mice.

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Governor Cuomo Signs Legislation Allowing Park Rangers to Administer Epi-Pens to Treat Allergic Reactions

As a direct result of Food Allergy Awareness Day NY at the end of May, Governor Andrew Cuomo has enacted S.4375/A.4652. The law authorizes Forest Rangers, Park Rangers and Environmental Conservation Police Officers to Possess and Administer Epinephrine through an Auto-Injector Device in NYS parks. Senator James Tedisco and assembly member Angelo Santabarbara share why this law is so important in protecting individuals with life-threatening allergies at risk for anaphylaxis.

Governor Cuomo Signs Legislation Allowing Park Rangers to Administer Epi-Pens to Treat Allergic Reactions

Govenor Andrew Cuomo signing bill

Legislation (S.4375/A.4652) Authorizes Forest Rangers, Park Rangers and Environmental Conservation Police Officers to Possess and Administer Epinephrine through an Auto-Injector Device Legislation Signed as New York State Parks See Record Visitation in 2020

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today signed legislation (S.4375/A.4652) authorizing forest rangers, park rangers and environmental conservation police officers to possess and administer epinephrine auto-injectors. Epinephrine is commonly used to treat serious allergic reactions such as bee stings, insect bites, food allergies or exercise-induced shock.

"More New Yorkers than ever are taking advantage of the natural beauty our state has to offer, but it's important to stay safe, especially if you're prone to severe allergic reactions," Governor Cuomo said. "This commonsense legislation allows a wider range of professionals in our state parks and other natural areas to use epinephrine auto-injectors and keep New Yorkers safe in the wild. This will give hikers, bikers and other outdoor travelers a greater sense of security as they navigate New York's serene natural areas."

Anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction, occurs in roughly one in 50 Americans. Many parks and forests in New York State are far from medical facilities, and this legislation allows professionals in state parks and forests, which are often far from medical facilities, to administer epinephrine auto-injectors to people who have allergic reactions.

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Grothman Introduces Dillon’s Law In US Congress

After their son Dillon suffered a fatal attack of anaphylaxis after being stung by a bee, Angel and George Mueller became dedicated advocates for individuals and families with life-threatening allergies. Since being enacted in Wisconsin, Dillon's Law has saved several lives; Minnesota and Indiana promptly adopted the same legislation. Now Dillon's Law has gone to Washington DC; its' introduction in Congress provides hope to all allergy activist advocates across America.

Grothman Introduces Dillon’s Law In US Congress

Dillon Mueller with tractor
Dillon Mueller
June 22, 2021

By Timothy Svoboda
Washington, DC

Congressmen Glenn Grothman (WI-06) has introduced Dillon’s Law, a bill that will incentivize states to allow “good Samaritans” to save lives. This bill will allow states to use existing federal grant money for preventative health services to be used to train individuals to carry and administer epinephrine.

The bill was inspired by Dillon Mueller, a Mishicot, WI native who tragically passed away in 2014 at the age of 18 after being stung by a bee and falling into a coma due to anaphylaxis. Dillon was unable to receive epinephrine in a timely manner.

Versions of Grothman’s bill have already been signed into law in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Indiana with overwhelming bipartisan support. While similar legislation passed Congress in 2013 providing incentives for states to develop emergency epinephrine programs within school systems, this legislation would make epinephrine training more widely available, enabling more individuals to prevent tragedies involving anaphylaxis from occurring.

“Dillon Mueller’s passing was a tragedy,” said Grothman. "No parent should have to endure the loss of a child, and that is what Dillon’s parents, Angel and George, are working to prevent.

"This bill isn’t limited to children, however. The legislation incentivizes states to allow any properly trained individual to administer epinephrine to someone experiencing a severe allergic reaction.

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