Dillon Mueller Memorial Fund Helps Save Lives

This story about the death of Dillon Mueller of Wisconsin reminds us of Ruthie T. Cornell, our founder Jon Terry’s sister. She also died from a bee sting and did not know she was allergic. Like George and Angel Mueller, we have worked tirelessly to have legislation enacted. We want everyone from bus drivers to first responders and restaurant workers to have access to non-patient specific epinephrine. And just like Dillon’s parents, we conduct training sessions for anyone who wants to learn what to do in an anaphylaxis emergency and how to use an epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) device. Dillon’s family knows of at least 7 people whose lives were saved because of their efforts.

Dillon Mueller Memorial Fund Helps Save Lives

Dillon Mueller on Dirt Bike

Fund Helps Increase Availability of Epinephrine in Wisconsin

By Kristen Stewart
May 14th, 2020

By the time he turned 18 years old, Dillon Mueller of Mishicot, Wisconsin had already spent years making an impression on his family, friends, and community.

He was an award-winning dirt bike racer since the age of 6, an Eagle Scout, and a member of Future Farmers of America. He was so beloved the crowd chanted "Do It for Dillon" to raise the bids when he volunteered his services at a fundraising auction. He made a difference in quieter ways too. He showed a genuine interest in others and befriended everyone at school from the autistic kids to the quarterback to the teachers. He was also the first in line to help anyone in need. "Even though he was in his barn clothes, if somebody wanted help, he'd be off and running with cow poop still on his shoes," remembers his mother Angel.

The youngest of Angel and her husband George's three sons, Dillon was supposed to be the seventh generation to run their family farm. Instead he is leaving a different kind of legacy — one of donated organs and as the inspiration for the Dillon Mueller Memorial Fund which works tirelessly to provide greater access to epinephrine in Wisconsin and around the country.

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Now What? A Layman’s Appraisal of Covid-19…

We hate to pile on with the doom and gloom, but this article describes the current situation and all the possible after-effects on such things as funding for charitable causes. Since asthma sufferers might be at increased risk if exposed to the virus, we are including links to some excellent webinars for all on practical treatment suggestions to those exposed to COVID-19. Meanwhile we remain hopeful about upcoming legislation at both the federal and state levels to address the specific needs of those living with severe allergies such as requiring training and awareness at restaurants.

As we hear more positive news about medications that work as well as vaccines, we will be sure to pass it on!

Now What? A Layman’s Appraisal of Covid-19…

Allergy Advocacy Association Logo Covid-19 Question Marks

…how it effects Allergy Advocacy and….well, everything else, too

By Jon Terry, founder
April 14th, 2020

Greetings.  At this time of international crisis, I sincerely hope all our readers are healthy and safe.

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted almost everyone around the globe.  So many serious questions remain unanswered. How many lives will be lost? How many more individuals will become infected?  How long will so many people need intensive medical care?  When will the number of people at risk for COVID-19 begin to decline? (Who knows?)

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FARE & Friends Making the Case on Capitol Hill

Two days of attending presentations and advocating with our legislators in Washington, DC gave us a very positive outlook on the future of protecting our love ones who have life-threatening allergies. Read all about the topics discussed and the specific legislation we are advocating for, along with numerous photos of the 150 people of all ages who attended. Next year FARE hopes to fly in five hundred activists and advocates, so Washington will know we will not be ignored!

Members of the New York State FARE contingent at US Capitol building

Edited by Jon Terry
March 11th, 2020

Greetings. On March 3rd and 4th the Food Allergy Research Education (FARE) organization hosted the “Courage at Congress Advocacy Day to Fight Food Allergies.” Your Allergy Advocacy Association proudly participated in conference and lobbying activities.

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Study Shows High Costs and Burden of Peanut Allergy

The need for a treatment for peanut allergies becomes more apparent when a recent study showed that those living with an allergy to peanuts have almost double the annual healthcare costs for patients who didn’t have a peanut allergy. Out of 42,000 people studied, 36% of the peanut allergy patients had experienced anaphylaxis and 33% had visited an emergency department, compared to 20% of those without a peanut allergy.

Study Shows High Costs and Burden of Peanut Allergy

A pile of peanuts

By: Gwen Smith
February 6, 2020

A study of a large U.S. health insurer database reveals the high dollar and health costs for those living with peanut allergy.

Using the IBM MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database, researchers analyzed insurance claims for almost 42,000 patients with peanut allergy between January 2011 and September 2015. They found that:

-The yearly “all-cause” healthcare costs for patients who had a peanut allergy diagnostic code was $6,400 a year. That was almost double the “all-cause” annual healthcare costs ($3,500) for patients who didn’t have the peanut allergy code.

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All About Epinephrine: What It Does in a Reaction, How Long It Lasts, When It Gets Hot or Cold

Allergic Living magazine and Gina Clowes at AllergyMoms.com reached out to Dr. Julie Brown, an emergency medicine physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital, for her expertise on anaphylaxis and epinephrine. In this article she answers frequently asked questions on how to know when to administer an Epi-Pen©, how it works, when to give a second dose, expiration dates, and what happens to epinephrine when subjected to significant heat or cold exposure.

All About Epinephrine: What It Does in a Reaction,
How Long It Lasts, When It Gets Hot or Cold

Dr. Julie Brown
Gina Clowes

By Allergic Living
January 9, 2020

One of the nerve-racking parts of living with severe allergies is having to make the call about if and when an allergic reaction is anaphylaxis. A shot of epinephrine can save a life but having to inject ourselves or our child with a needle is something we did not sign up for. 

However, mistakes in the critical areas of recognizing and responding to anaphylaxis can mean the difference between life and death. Plus, studies are showing that prompt administration of epinephrine can simply reduce the chance that a food allergy reaction moves from relatively mild to severe anaphylaxis.

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