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Local College Implements New York’s Emergency Allergy Treatment Act

St. John Fisher College can serve as an example to colleges everywhere in being proactive to protect students with severe allergies. They are stocking epinephrine throughout the campus and conducting training sessions for security, health care personnel and resident assistants. As the college had three incidences of anaphylaxis last year alone, we are very proud to help in this important endeavor.

SJF College fire and safety officer Al Camp and A3 founder Jon Terry
SJF College fire and safety officer Al Camp and A3 founder Jon Terry

Local College Implements New York’s Emergency Allergy Treatment Act

By Janet Goldman
February 10th, 2018

St. John Fisher College is becoming a role model for local colleges and other public entities in western New York. As authorized by New York’s Emergency Allergy Treatment Act (EATA), the College is stocking epinephrine, making it available for students, staff and visitors as needed. With a non-specific epinephrine prescription, specifically trained College staff will be able to administer epinephrine to anyone suffering from anaphylaxis.


Al Camp, St. John Fisher College’s Fire & Safety Officer, is coordinating the College’s “Severe Allergy Program.” He explained, “Anaphylactic episodes can occur at any time. We recognized that the College’s Health and Wellness Center hours may not always be able to accommodate our campus community in the case of a severe allergic reaction.” Their ongoing mission is to continuously improve the community’s safety. This past year, the campus had three anaphylactic events and one in 2016.

Camp credited Jon Terry and his allergy association for inspiring him to develop this allergy program:

“I have followed Jon Terry’s work and the Allergy Advocacy Association newsletter for a few years and that was instrumental in searching out the ability to offer this service.”


“With the support of the College administration,” Camp explained “the Safety and Security staff developed the training program. We followed the guidance from NYS Public Health Law, Article 30, Section 3000-C.

Fisher’s training program will include the nineteen security staff and two members of the health care staff. In addition to the severe allergy training, Camp explained, “we teach the nationally accredited AHA (American Heart Association) heart saver CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)/AED (Automated External Defibrillator)/First Aid course containing the severe allergy module.”

The College’s Office of Safety and Security is located fifty feet from the main dining hall. Similarly, security staff are located one minute from most dormitories. Two security vehicles are available for the outer reaches of the College grounds. However, with a small campus, the security staff “could walk edge to edge in ten minutes.”

In ten AED cabinets, the College will store the epinephrine auto-injectors. “There is always a possibility that the AED will be required,” Camp explained. He said, “Our ten AED devices are located at high assembly areas, near dining halls, and typically with a 90-second walk.” Additionally, they will store one set in the health center. To communicate this new program, Camp will use the College’s weekly electronic newsletter, College News Highlights and the parent newsletter, Fisher Family News.

Aware of the marketplace’s options, Camp chose the Auvi-Q as he “found it much easier to use.” With Kaléo, he was able to arrange a suitable discount. Using a non-specific prescription provided by the College’s health care center staff, Camp arranged for the epinephrine auto-injectors to arrive in early January.


Regarding expanding the training program, Camp explained, “Our main goal will be to avoid the need to administer the medication through allergy awareness training. We certainly plan to expand awareness training across our entire campus community.

At the present time, the College already has prevention strategies. Camp explained, “We are using a three-pronged approach, a ‘know what you eat’ for students and our campus community, a ‘know what you serve’ for food service staff and lastly, the ability to administer the drug if required (by security or health center staff).” Additionally, for the dormitories, Camp said, “We already provide an allergy and first aid awareness course to our resident assistants. We will expand on this once our new program is in place.”

“The food service staff has an awareness program in place and the directors reach out to students with known food allergy concerns. Our Early Learning Center staff is already trained to administer medications per NYS day care requirements but parents must provide the EpiPen for their child. At this point in time, our daycare center is not ready to stock epinephrine for those without prescriptions.”

To ensure the training program’s effectiveness, Camp will provide oversight. His staff will record all events and outcomes. Furthermore, Camp will provide refresher training as required. Regarding the program’s future, Camp envisions continued support. When the epinephrine auto-injectors need to be replaced due to usage or expiration, he believes funds will be available through the College’s own budget resources.

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