What to Do If You Can’t Afford Epinephrine Auto-Injectors

Having an allergy can be challenging and inconvenient. When it’s life threatening it can be deadly. We know that epinephrine helps stop attacks of anaphylaxis; it’s vital that individuals at risk have access. But what do you do when the costs make that access difficult? To help with affordability the manufacturers of epinephrine auto-injectors have extended their savings program through 2021. In addition there may be other steps you could take to help lower your cost of epinephrine auto-injectors (EAI) devices.

What to Do If You Can’t Afford Epinephrine Auto-Injectors

Doctor's stethoscope on Greenback Bills

Kids With Food Allergies 3/5/21

The manufacturers of epinephrine devices have extended their U.S. savings programs through 2021.

Epinephrine is the only treatment for a severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis [anna-fih-LACK-sis]. It is only available through a prescription by your doctor. Each prescription comes with two auto-injectors in a two-pack.

People with food allergies should have two epinephrine devices available to them at all times. For children, this might mean needing more than one two-pack. For example, your child may need to keep two devices at school and two at after-school care. Another set of two typically stays at home. For adults, two epinephrine devices may be enough.

Here are the updated savings offers for epinephrine auto-injectors and pre-filled syringes, as well as other ideas to try to save money on drug costs this year. Your final co-pay, if any, may vary depending on your insurance plan and the deductibles for your family. Discuss with your doctor which epinephrine device is the right one for your family.

Savings Programs for Epinephrine Devices

  • AUVI-Q® — AUVI-Q has two assistance programs. People with commercial insurance may be able to get AUVI-Q for as little as $0. Eligible patients without commercial insurance or Medicaid may be able to get AUVI-Q for no cost through the kaléo Cares Patient Assistance Program. Call 1-877-30-AUVI-Q for questions about eligibility.
  • EpiPen 2-Pak® — Use The EpiPen Savings Card® to reduce out-of-pocket expenses for a maximum benefit of $300 per EpiPen® two-pack (up to three cartons per prescription). It can be redeemed up to six times. If your pharmacy does not accept the card, your pharmacist can call Mylan to confirm at 1-800-796-9526 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. ET, Monday-Friday). Mylan also has a Patient Assistance Program.
  • Authorized Generic for EpiPen® (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injector — Use the Mylan's Epinephrine Injection, USP Auto-Injector Savings Card to reduce out-of-pocket expenses for a maximum benefit of $25 per generic two-pack. It can be redeemed up to three times. If your pharmacy does not accept the card, your pharmacist can call Mylan to confirm at 1-800-796-9526 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. ET, Monday-Friday). Mylan also has a Patient Assistance Program.
  • Authorized Generic of Adrenaclick® Epinephrine Auto-Injector — People with commercial insurance may receive these auto-injectors from Amneal Pharmaceuticals at $0 cost. Cash paying patients may get up to $10 off per pack of their out-of-pocket cost. If you have any questions, call 1-855-449-4712.
    CVS Health is selling these generic epinephrine auto-injectors at all CVS Pharmacy locations at a cash price of $109.99 for a two-pack.
    Teva Pharmaceutical Industries offers a generic version epinephrine auto-injector. People with commercial insurance may save up to $30 per carton, up to three per prescription. If you have any questions, call 1-800-422-5604.
  • SYMJEPI™ pre-filled epinephrine syringeSYMJEPI™ is a portable syringe pre-filled with epinephrine. It is not an auto-injector. It comes in a two-pack and is available in 0.15 mg and 0.3 mg. With insurance, some patients may pay as little as $0 per prescription. Patients with state-funded or federally funded programs are not eligible.

Other Possible Ways to Save Money

  • Change insurance plans — If you are privately insured through work, see if you can shop around during open enrollment. If your family’s income is below a certain level, you might be offered Medicaid and/or your children might qualify under The Children's Health Insurance Program. This depends on your state. Visit Healthcare.gov or your state’s health insurance site.
  • Switch to the “preferred” device for your plan — If you have prescription benefits, you may save on copays by agreeing to use the epinephrine device that is on the insurance “preferred” list.
  • Use mail order — If you have prescription benefits, look into your plan’s mail order pharmacy options. This may give you a lower price or provide more two-packs of medicine for the same price. Many mail order prescription plans provide patients with a three month’s supply of medicine for the cost of two month’s copay.
  • Talk to your doctor — If you have insurance, talk to your doctor. Sometimes they can write the prescription so that you can get more sets of medicine for one copay. Typically, a two-pack of epinephrine auto-injectors is considered a 30-day supply under your prescription plan. A physician might ask for six auto-injectors (three two-packs) to be filled at once. This could then be filled through the mail order pharmacy, as described above.
  • Shop around — Call around to different pharmacies. Prices can vary, especially between large chain pharmacies and smaller independent pharmacies. Be aware that the pharmacies at club stores such as Costco and Sam’s are generally available to non-members too.
  • Check with the local children’s hospital — This option may work if your child sees doctors at a major children’s hospital. Ask if they have any grants or patient assistance programs that can help pay for your child’s prescription.
  • Talk to your employer — If you have medical insurance through an employer, contact their human resources department. Explain that your insurance is not covering a life-saving medicine for you or your child. Sometimes, if you have a generous employer, they will try to help you.

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Originally published January 2015. Updated March 2021.