E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

December 2021 e-news Issue

Happy holidays! As we make our plans and set our goals for the New Year, we would love to hear your thoughts on how we're doing, as well as your suggestions for services we can provide to help keep everyone safe. Feel free to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or post share your thoughts on our Facebook page.

Looking for a worthy cause for your donation? We humbly suggest our "Remembering Ruthie" fundraising campaign. Please use our website to register as a new member of our association. We need your help to save lives from diagnosed and undiagnosed life-threatening allergies thru our Epi Near You New York anaphylaxis emergency training program. Here is the link leading you to our donations page. We are very grateful for any support you may choose to offer us.

ANNOUNCING: Anaphylaxis Emergency Training direct from the internet into your home or office!

Our Epi Near You NY anaphylaxis emergency training program is now VIRTUAL!
Our association would help provide:
  -Free state approved training presentation
-New York State recognized certification
-Assistance for public entities to obtain a non-patient specific prescription for emergency epinephrine

For more information, visit our Epi Near You New York webpage.

We hope you will find the New Year's e-news issue interesting and informative. Best wishes to one and all in 2022!

Here’s wishing everyone a “NORMAL” New Year???

Here’s wishing everyone a “NORMAL” New Year???

The holiday season often brings with it a reflection of the past year. Its highs, its lows, the challenges that we may have encountered and our hopes for the impending new year. Here Allergy Advocacy Association co-founder Jon Terry reflects upon this past year and offers his best wishes for a “normal” new year.

Graphic Image 1940s Little Girl and Mom

By Jon Terry
December 6th, 2021

Greetings. As the holiday season begins, I sincerely hope you and your families are healthy and safe.

“Mom? What is…NORMAL?”
“It’s just a setting on the clothes dryer, honey.”

Looking back upon 2021, here in New York State I kept hoping and praying for a return to "NORMAL." I mean “NORMAL” from my own very personal perspective; of course, everyone has their own point of view and certainly yours will be a lot different from mine. Day after day, however, I didn't see much of anything resembling "NORMAL" happening all around me.

Just like everyone else the pandemic has changed so many different parts of my life: 

COVID-19 testing, social distancing, mask-wearing, vaccinations, busted businesses, price inflation, career changes, job losses, travel disruptions, recreation restrictions, isolation, loneliness, etc.  

I still feel reluctant to accept just how much daily life has been altered. Like it or not, I know things are never going to be entirely the same again.

For my work as an allergy activist advocate, all my routines, relationships and public events had to be changed. Naturally, that also included the Allergy Advocacy Association, too. To help me and our association to adapt, we followed the example of other activist advocates and non-profits; we listened to suggestions from our friends and affiliates; we learned from their new experiences working on behalf of individuals and families with life-threatening allergies.

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Study Finds Epinephrine Remains Alarmingly Underused for Anaphylaxis in Children

Cases of anaphylaxis in children are on the rise. And while there has been an increase in cases, the use of epinephrine “the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis and the only drug known to halt its progression — remains at suboptimal levels”. These were the findings of a recent study presented by  Dr Juli Wang, at the annual conference of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The report stated that “delayed administration of epinephrine has been linked to greater risk of a biphasic reaction, a reoccurrence of anaphylaxis that can happen hours after the initial symptoms are treated”. Dr. Wang is an MD and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Viatris Epi-Pen

Study Finds Epinephrine Remains Alarmingly Underused for Anaphylaxis in Children

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By Dave Bloom
2021/11/08

Dr Juli Wang, started her presentation of key updates in pediatric anaphylaxis at the annual conference of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) with a warning:

Anaphylaxis remains an important allergic disorder, and the prevalence has been rising.

Dr Wang is an MD and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and the substance of her talk provided ample evidence.

According to data derived from the National Inpatient Sample on 2006 to 2015 cases of anaphylaxis, the prevalence has risen across most age groups — 3 to younger than 6 years, 6 to younger than 12 years, and 12 to younger than 18 years — with the highest increases seen in preschool- and elementary-aged children. Cases for children younger than 3 years remained steady.

Despite the rise in incidence, the use of epinephrine — the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis and the only drug known to halt its progression — remains at suboptimal levels.

Data from 20 studies show that following anaphylaxis from any cause, epinephrine was administered in as little as 1.4% of instances that subsequently required response from emergency medical services personnel and hospitalization.

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Shazhad Mustafa, MD: Advancing Pediatric Peanut Allergy Management

If you are the parent of a child with a peanut allergy, you understand the challenges of both educating your child and being vigilant in avoiding contact with peanuts, or products that include peanuts. Both the challenges and means to decrease peanut sensitivity were topics at a recent Annual Scientific Meeting meeting of the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology (ACAAI). Included were discussions of Palforzia, a treatment option intended to decrease sensitivity to peanuts over time in pediatric populations.

Syed Shahzad Mustafa, MD, the University of Rochester Medicine and Dentistry, spoke with HPCLive regarding some of the data presented at ACAAI, as well as what physicians and caregivers could do to aid in the adoption of Palforzia therapy.

Shazhad Mustafa, MD: Advancing Pediatric Peanut Allergy Management

November 11, 2021
Armand Butera

Dr. S. Shazad Mustafa speaks on new data related to peanut allergy and Palforzia therapy that were presented at the most recent ACAAI session.

Syed Mustafa, MD

This past weekend, Aimmune Therapeutics presented new data at the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting that detailed the burden of peanut allergy (PA) in affected patients, as well as real-world experiences with Palforzia, a treatment option intended to decrease sensitivity to peanuts over time in pediatric populations.

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Breast Milk from Mennonite Moms on Farms May Better Protect Babies from Allergies

Allergies now appear to be prevalent in our society, but that wasn’t always the case. Until the beginning of the 20th century, having a food allergy was rare. What factors have contributed to this explosion and what can we learn to perhaps find ways to help protect people. A fascinating study, by Dr Kirsi Järvinen-Seppo, an associate professor at the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and the Center for Food Allergy of the University of Rochester and Antti E. Seppo PHD

University of Rochester Medical School; Research Associate Professor explore the farming life of Mennotie families in upstate New York. In this study the authors examine the potential allergy protection benefits of breast milk from Mennontite moms to their babies as compared to the breast milk from mothers in urban settings.

Breast Milk from Mennonite Moms on Farms May Better Protect Babies from Allergies

Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, MD
Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, MD
Dr. Antti E. Seppo, PhD
Antti E. Seppo, PhD

This article was originally published in Frontiers in Immunology October 2021.

Women from traditional farming communities, such as old order Mennonites, may pass protection against atopic diseases on to their infants through their milk

Published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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