E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

February 2020

In February love is in the air, and we want you to know that you are always in our hearts and minds. For all the Valentine’s Day celebrations at school, be sure to remind your child’s teachers of any food allergies they have. Visit SnackSafely.com for Dave Bloom's complete and accurate list of allergen-free treats.

Hope is also in the air since the Food and Drug Administration recently approved Palforzia©, the first medication for treatment of peanut allergies. Read all about this exciting new product, and rest assured that your Allergy Advocacy Association will continue to work for reasonable prices for all allergy treatments on the market.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all!

The Latest News About Palforzia©

Amidst all the celebrations that an effective new treatment for peanut allergies was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, high cost is a major concern. Called Palforzia©, the medication is very simply an exactly measured dose of peanut flour (!) in a very expensive capsule. Previously the only treatment was avoidance and then hoping that epinephrine was on hand after accidental ingestion. Read the article below and plan to have a conversation with your allergist to see if this new therapy might be right for your child. Hopefully insurance companies will provide adequate coverage for this important treatment.

AR101 Palforzia capsules

The First Treatment Approved by the FDA for Peanut Allergies

Edited by Jon Terry
February 10, 2020

The Food and Drug Administration has approved Palforzia©, the first medication for treatment of peanut allergies. Palforzia is the brand name of an oral immunotherapy (OIT) formerly known as AR101 while it was being developed and undergoing clinical trials.

Aimmune Therapeutics, the company that has developed and tested Palforzia, states that the medication is intended to treat children ages 4 to 17 that have been diagnosed with a peanut allergy. It’s estimated that more than 1 million children (2.2%) in the United States have peanut allergies. Until now, parents who wanted keep their kids safe have had very few options.

Continue Reading

Study Shows High Costs and Burden of Peanut Allergy

The need for a treatment for peanut allergies becomes more apparent when a recent study showed that those living with an allergy to peanuts have almost double the annual healthcare costs for patients who didn’t have a peanut allergy. Out of 42,000 people studied, 36% of the peanut allergy patients had experienced anaphylaxis and 33% had visited an emergency department, compared to 20% of those without a peanut allergy.

Study Shows High Costs and Burden of Peanut Allergy

A pile of peanuts

By: Gwen Smith
February 6, 2020

A study of a large U.S. health insurer database reveals the high dollar and health costs for those living with peanut allergy.

Using the IBM MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database, researchers analyzed insurance claims for almost 42,000 patients with peanut allergy between January 2011 and September 2015. They found that:

-The yearly “all-cause” healthcare costs for patients who had a peanut allergy diagnostic code was $6,400 a year. That was almost double the “all-cause” annual healthcare costs ($3,500) for patients who didn’t have the peanut allergy code.

-In a follow-up analysis of the next 12 months, 36% of the peanut allergy patients had a code in their records showing they’d been treated for an anaphylactic reaction.

-In the original analysis, 33% of the peanut allergy patients had visited an emergency department, compared to 20% without peanut allergy.

Continue Reading

“First of Its Kind” Oral Treatment of Anaphylaxis

We’re all familiar with the Epi-Pen© for the treatment of a life-threatening allergic reaction, and now a “first of its kind” oral sublingual film formulation that delivers epinephrine systemically is in development for the treatment of anaphylaxis. The FDA recently said that that no additional studies would be necessary prior to opening the proposed Investigational New Drug (IND) Application for AQST-108. The Administration indicated that there appears to be an unmet medical need among patients who resist the standard of care use of intramuscular injection (epinephrine auto-injector) in the treatment of anaphylaxis, and that AQST-108 may potentially address some of those unmet needs.

“First of Its Kind” Oral Treatment of Anaphylaxis

Woman holding up an Aquestive AQST108 Epinephrine Film

FDA Opens Door for Clinical Development of Aquestive Therapeutics Anaphylaxis Treatment

By  News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release

2020/02/06
-Pre-IND Meeting on AQST-108 Completed
-FDA Confirmed AQST-108 To Be Reviewed Under 505(b)(2)
-No Additional Clinical Studies Would Be Required Prior to Opening Proposed IND
-Pivotal Pharmacokinetic (PK) Clinical Trials Planned To Be Initiated Before Year End 2020

Continue Reading

“This Is A Simple Step That Will Undoubtedly Save Countless Lives

If defibrillators are required on every airliner, why not an epinephrine auto-injector? Despite resistance from the airline industry, two U.S. Senators and a Representative recently urged the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to require that U.S.-based commercial airlines include EAI devices in their onboard emergency medical kits (EMKs). Rep. Khanna of California has been particularly supportive in leading the campaign for greater funding into allergy research and treatment options. She helped secure an increase of $362 million in funding for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) with a directive to invest in food allergy research, and an additional $10 million for the Peer-Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP) under the Department of Defense.  

“This Is A Simple Step That Will Undoubtedly Save Countless Lives.”

FAA logo

Rep. Khanna, Senators Duckworth & Schumer Urge FAA to Require EAI Devices On Every Airliner

Press Release
February 7, 2020 

Washington, DC – Today, Rep. Ro Khanna (CA-17), Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) urged the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to require that U.S.-based commercial airlines include epinephrine auto-injectors in their onboard emergency medical kits (EMKs). 

Continue Reading

The information provided on this site is in no way intended to be a substitute for medical advice,
diagnosis, or treatment with a licensed physician.
The Allergy Advocacy Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, tax-exempt organization.
Copyright 2020 © Allergy Advocacy Association, Inc. All rights reserved.  Terms & Conditions