E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

February 2022 e-news Issue

Greetings! We at the Allergy Advocacy Association hope that your 2002 is off to a good start. In this issue of our newsletter, you will find out about promising federal legislation to address the prescription drug shortage. Food labeling is essential for those with life threatening allergies, but does it go far enough? Here you will learn about Precautionary Allergen labeling (PAL) as well as the Food Labeling Modernization Act and how you can lend your voice for improved food labeling. A promising study on peanut oral immunotherapy for small children is looked at in this issue. And with Valentine’s Day quickly approaching, being able to find safe Valentine treats is essential. Here you will find David Bloom’s Valentine edition of his safe snack guide.

What is anaphylaxis? How would you recognize an anaphylactic attack, and would you know what to do? For many people, even those that have a life-threatening allergy, the answer is no.

The Allergy Advocacy Association has a solution:
Our Epi Near You NY anaphylaxis emergency training program 
(and its VIRTUAL! Direct from the internet into your home or office)

Our virtual association would help provide:

  • Free state approved training presentation
  • New York State recognized certification
  • Assistance for public entities to obtain a non-patient specific prescription for emergency epinephrine

For more information, visit our "Epi Near You New York" webpage.

New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

We’ve all spent time looking at the expiration date labels in our fridge and pantry. Sometimes it's apparent that the food in question has gone bad, but sometimes it isn’t. And sometimes the product is fine past the date on the label. The same can be true for prescription drugs. That is the reason that U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) have introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply.

New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

FDA Logo

Reporting by Jon Terry
January 20, 2022

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply. According to the FDA, amending the expiration date of some prescription drugs may alleviate the shortages that the United States currently is facing.

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Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Having a life-threatening food allergy is scary for anyone, but when you’re the parent of a young child with one, that fear is a constant. A recent NIH funded clinical study examined the impact of peanut oral immunotherapy to children one to three years old who are highly peanut allergic. The results were positive and provide hope for finding additional methods to desensitize young children to peanut allergies.

Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Wesley Burks, MD and Edwin Kim, MD head shots
Wesley Burks, MD, and Edwin Kim, MD

This study, called IMPACT, was co-led by A. Wesley Burks, MD, CEO of UNC Health and dean of the UNC School of Medicine. Edwin Kim, MD, is co-author on the paper and leads peanut allergy research at the UNC School of Medicine.

January 20, 2022

A clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that giving peanut oral immunotherapy to highly peanut-allergic children ages 1 to 3 years safely desensitized most of them to peanut and induced remission of peanut allergy in one-fifth of participants.

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It’s a Brand-New Year But Labeling in the US Remain s a Danger to the Allergic Community

If you have food allergies, then reading a product's label is second nature. It's what you do to help keep you safe. But what happens when a product’s label doesn’t tell the whole story? Listing the ingredients is essential, and required by the FDA, but what about how a product is made? The FDA doesn’t require what is known in the allergen community as Precautionary Allergen Labeling (PAL).

Without that type of information, those suffering allergies can still be at risk. Learn more about PAL and how you can tell the FDA of its importance.

It’s a Brand-New Year But Labeling in the US Remain s a Danger to the Allergic Community

Snacksafely FoodLabel with text
Dave Bloom
Dave Bloom

Dave Bloom
2022/01/10

Welcome to 2022! You’ve made your resolutions, hung that brand new “World’s Cutest Puppies” calendar, and are ready to start a fresh new year bursting with endless opportunities!

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Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Valentine’s Day is a day that can be fun, frustrating and maybe a little anxious for parents, and for other folks as well. But if you’re the parent of a child with a life-threatening food allergy it provides additional challenges of finding safe foods for Valentine treats. But no worry, Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have you taken care of with this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide.

Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Snacksafely Valentines Day Treats Guide

Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have published this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide, their extensive catalogs of allergy-friendly foods relied upon by thousands of schools and tens of thousands of families nationwide to help keep allergens out of the home and the classroom.

Each guide is interactive: click any entry to see precisely how that product is manufactured with respect to the 11 allergens we track (peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, crustacean shellfish, sesame, mustard, and gluten) including shared line/facility information you won’t find on the label or anywhere else, as well as links to the product’s store finder, website, and Amazon page.

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