Editorial: The Coming Healthcare Apocalypse for the Food Allergy Community

Editorial: The Coming Healthcare Apocalypse for the Food Allergy Community

Dave Bloom, CEO of SnackSafely.com, is very concerned about the Trump Administration’s recent efforts to once again try to strike down the Affordable Care Act without any concrete proposals to replace it. While Republicans wisely decided to hold off until after the November elections, many people are worried because food allergies would be considered a preexisting condition.

DoctorsNote: I'm Sorry

By Dave Bloom
March 27, 2019

Earlier this week, the Trump Administration told a federal appeals court that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) — commonly known as “Obamacare” — should be struck down in its entirety. This contrasts its previous assertion that “only” the provisions protecting those with preexisting conditions should be struck down while preserving the rest of the law including the expansion of Medicare.

Some 20 million Americans receive their health insurance under provisions of the ACA and another 100+ million are protected by the ACA’s provisions covering those with preexisting conditions.

It doesn’t much matter if you are a red-state Republican or a blue-state Democrat, if you suffer from food allergies, you have a preexisting condition. Your healthcare coverage could be discontinued in its entirety, your policy could be amended to exclude expenses arising from your preexisting conditions, or your premiums could skyrocket, making your insurance too expensive to afford.

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Urge Your Elected Officials to Co-Sponsor the FASTER Act!

Recognizing the growing number of Americans with severe food allergies, Congresswoman Doris Matsui introduced the FASTER Act to make federal policy changes that will improve the health, safety and inclusion of the 32 million people living with them. The act would fund the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to collect information on the prevalence of food allergies and allergens, update package labeling to include sesame, and study the economic costs of living with food allergies. Congresswoman Matsui believes more research and evidence-based solutions are needed to help understand, treat, and maybe one day prevent food allergies.

Urge Your Elected Officials to Co-Sponsor the FASTER Act!

Jared, kid with allergies
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Food Allergy Research & Education 

Nearly 32 million Americans—including kids like Jared (pictured above)—live with food allergies and related disorders. These diseases affect their health and quality of life.

That’s why Congresswoman Doris Matsui introduced the Food Allergy Safety, Treatment, Education, and Research (FASTER) Act to improve the health and safety of those living with food allergies and related disorders.

The Food Allergy Safety, Treatment, Education and Research (FASTER) Act, a package of federal policy changes that will improve the health, safety and inclusion of the 32 million Americans living with food allergies, was introduced by Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CA).

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Could Your Mindset Affect How Well A Treatment Works?

Now that more and more parents are willing to try peanut patches and powders in order to build up an immunity to life-threatening allergies in their children, there are fears about possible side effects. Researchers are finding that when they frame the message that unpleasant side effects are a positive signal that the treatment is working, patients are less likely to drop out of studies and will continue on with the daily regimens.

Could Your Mindset Affect How Well A Treatment Works?

Mindset for Allergy Treatment drawing
Chris Madde/Getty Images

By Esther Landhuis
March 1, 2019

Anxiety about side effects can keep people from starting or sticking to drug regimens or medical procedures. A group of researchers at Stanford University wanted to find out whether a simple mindset shift could help patients tolerate an uncomfortable treatment. They learned that when physicians make the effort to reframe potentially unpleasant symptoms in a positive light, it helped patients to stay calm and persevere.

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Your Environment Is Cleaner Your Immune System Has Never Been So Unprepared

Should kids pick their nose? Eat dirt? Avoid antibacterial soap? A dermatologist in Denver who treats people with allergies and autoimmune disorders says definitely “yes!” Believing our world is becoming much too sanitized, Dr. Meg Lemon advises that our immune system is not getting a good workout, and we are therefore more susceptible to allergens. Research going back as far as 1872 agrees with the hypothesis that when the immune system is not properly trained it overreacts and develops allergies, or in other words, chronic immune system attacks.

Your Environment Is Cleaner
Your Immune System Has Never Been So Unprepared

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A century ago, British scientists suggested a link between increased hygiene and allergic conditions — the first hint that our immune systems are becoming improperly “trained.”
Credit Mike McQuade

By Matt Richtel, March 12, 2019
Excerpted from “An Elegant Defense: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System,” published on Tuesday by William Morrow.

Should you pick your nose?

Don’t laugh. Scientifically, it’s an interesting question.

Should your children pick their noses? Should your children eat dirt? Maybe: Your body needs to know what immune challenges lurk in the immediate environment.

Should you use antibacterial soap or hand sanitizers? No. Are we taking too many antibiotics? Yes.

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DBV Technologies Sets Sights on FDA Resubmission for Peanut Allergy Treatment

Good news! DBV Technologies is preparing to resubmit their application to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a new treatment for peanut allergies in children called Viaskin Peanut, better known as the peanut patch. The company has obtained Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy designation from the FDA and is planning to submit by the third quarter of this year, a faster than expected timeframe. Meanwhile, rival Aimmune Therapeutics has already submitted their application and may win U.S. approval for its drug ahead of DBV.

DBV Technologies Sets Sights on FDA Resubmission for Peanut Allergy Treatment

Opened peanut shells with peanuts

By Ned Pagliarulo
Feb. 14, 2019

Dive Brief:

DBV Technologies expects to resubmit its experimental treatment for peanut allergy to the Food and Drug Administration by the third quarter of this year, a speedier-than-expected path back to the regulator after the company withdrew its original application last December. 

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