AAFA and MedicAlert© Foundation Announce a New Pact to Help Save Lives

COVID-19 has certainly brought to everyone’s attention that people with asthma are at a greater risk of severe illness and hospitalization if they contract the virus. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) and the MedicAlert Foundation have joined forces to develop an online asthma or anaphylaxis treatment plan that will be part of a MedicAlert member’s health profile. In an emergency, MedicAlert will relay the action plan and other critical medical information to first responders to ensure fast and accurate treatment. If you have asthma or a life-threatening allergy, now is the time to get yourself a MedicAlert ID!

AAFA and MedicAlert© Foundation Announce a New Pact to Help Save Lives

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Partnership Raises Awareness of Asthma and Anaphylaxis

May 05, 2020
Source: Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

Washington, D.C., May 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Over 65 million people in the United States live with asthma or allergies to food, drugs or other allergens. Tragically, 3,600 people die each year from asthma – deaths that are often preventable. COVID-19 poses additional danger to these populations. Two leading non-profits have joined forces to raise awareness and provide resources for living with these potentially life-threatening conditions: asthma and anaphylaxis.

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FARE Launches Baby's First: Reduce the Risk of Food Allergies

FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education) is proud to announce a new initiative called “Baby’s First” that hopes to reduce the number of children who have food allergies. New and soon-to-be parents will have access to all the best information on introducing new foods, available in one place from a trusted source. Studies now show that introducing a variety of foods into a baby’s diet is recommended, including peanut foods, if the infant is at risk for a peanut allergy. Always check with your baby’s doctor first!

FARE Launches Baby’s First: Reduce the Risk of Food Allergies

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By  News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release

New Online Hub Dedicated to Raising Awareness and Educating New Parents

McLean, Va. (April 30, 2020) — Today, FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education), the world’s leading food allergy advocacy organization and the largest private funder of food allergy research, announced the launch of a new resource geared at raising awareness of the benefits of introducing a variety of new foods to babies and educating people on how they might be able to help reduce the risk of developing food allergies. 

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Families with Food Allergies Struggle with Bare Shelves

It’s hard enough for those who have multiple food allergies to find products that are safe for them to eat, but with many grocery shelves now empty, the challenge is even greater. Read here about many families who are struggling to find the foods they know are safe due to the hoarding and stocking up by others. Please keep your fellow allergy sufferers in mind and only buy what you need. Food manufacturers are trying to keep up with the demand, and you may be able to buy directly from them if the need arises.

Families with Food Allergies Struggle with Bare Shelves

Scant offerings at a grocery store in Brooklyn last month.
Photo credit...Sarah Blesener for The New York Times

As the coronavirus spreads and locked-down communities stock up, products needed by allergy sufferers are increasingly hard to come by.

By Eric Athas
April 7, 2020

Like many Americans these days, Lisa M. Delmont is kept up at night by worry. But for Ms. Delmont, it’s the empty grocery store shelves that bring on dread.

Her 2-year-old son, Benjamin, is severely allergic to milk, eggs, cashews, pistachios and bananas, so she has to be judicious about the items she brings home. Exposure to the wrong food could send Benjamin into anaphylactic shock, something that has happened three times since he was born.

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Transforming Allergy Diagnosis & Management

Everyone with allergies has probably experienced skin-prick tests and other assessments to find out exactly what they are allergic to. Today there is a new “ology” called molecular allergology that is innovating how allergies are diagnosed and treated. A routine blood test combined with molecular diagnostics will allow physicians to identify, with great specificity, the component proteins to which a patient is allergic. This new approach will also help gauge where a patient falls on the spectrum of possible reactions, so they will know what restrictions need to be put in place.

Transforming Allergy Diagnosis & Management

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By Rebecca Rice
Apr 28, 2020

Researchers estimate that in the US, more than 50 million adults and 26 million children suffer from allergies every year, with an estimated $18 billion annually in associated costs to the healthcare system and businesses—with no end in sight, as the number of individuals affected by allergies continues to rise.

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Study: Recurring Anaphylaxis Often Follows the Same Progression in Individuals

In this helpful article, researchers report that the large majority of people who experience recurrent anaphylaxis will suffer the exact same sequence of symptoms and reactions. So if one starts to experience symptoms of an allergic reaction, they will know to seek help immediately and administer an epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) device. Medical practitioners can teach their patients to recognize their unique symptoms to allow them to earlier identify anaphylaxis and administer therapeutic interventions.

Study: Recurring Anaphylaxis Often Follows the Same Progression in Individuals

Hopscotch

By Dave Bloom SnackSafely.com
2020/03/25

In a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, researchers at the University of Toronto sought to determine whether people who suffered recurring anaphylaxis had a similar progression of symptoms each time.

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