Breast Milk from Mennonite Moms on Farms May Better Protect Babies from Allergies

Allergies now appear to be prevalent in our society, but that wasn’t always the case. Until the beginning of the 20th century, having a food allergy was rare. What factors have contributed to this explosion and what can we learn to perhaps find ways to help protect people. A fascinating study, by Dr Kirsi Järvinen-Seppo, an associate professor at the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and the Center for Food Allergy of the University of Rochester and Antti E. Seppo PHD

University of Rochester Medical School; Research Associate Professor explore the farming life of Mennotie families in upstate New York. In this study the authors examine the potential allergy protection benefits of breast milk from Mennontite moms to their babies as compared to the breast milk from mothers in urban settings.

Breast Milk from Mennonite Moms on Farms May Better Protect Babies from Allergies

Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, MD
Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, MD
Dr. Antti E. Seppo, PhD
Antti E. Seppo, PhD

This article was originally published in Frontiers in Immunology October 2021.

Women from traditional farming communities, such as old order Mennonites, may pass protection against atopic diseases on to their infants through their milk

Published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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Study Finds Epinephrine Remains Alarmingly Underused for Anaphylaxis in Children

Cases of anaphylaxis in children are on the rise. And while there has been an increase in cases, the use of epinephrine “the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis and the only drug known to halt its progression — remains at suboptimal levels”. These were the findings of a recent study presented by  Dr Juli Wang, at the annual conference of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The report stated that “delayed administration of epinephrine has been linked to greater risk of a biphasic reaction, a reoccurrence of anaphylaxis that can happen hours after the initial symptoms are treated”. Dr. Wang is an MD and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Viatris Epi-Pen

Study Finds Epinephrine Remains Alarmingly Underused for Anaphylaxis in Children

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By Dave Bloom
2021/11/08

Dr Juli Wang, started her presentation of key updates in pediatric anaphylaxis at the annual conference of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) with a warning:

Anaphylaxis remains an important allergic disorder, and the prevalence has been rising.

Dr Wang is an MD and professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and the substance of her talk provided ample evidence.

According to data derived from the National Inpatient Sample on 2006 to 2015 cases of anaphylaxis, the prevalence has risen across most age groups — 3 to younger than 6 years, 6 to younger than 12 years, and 12 to younger than 18 years — with the highest increases seen in preschool- and elementary-aged children. Cases for children younger than 3 years remained steady.

Despite the rise in incidence, the use of epinephrine — the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis and the only drug known to halt its progression — remains at suboptimal levels.

Data from 20 studies show that following anaphylaxis from any cause, epinephrine was administered in as little as 1.4% of instances that subsequently required response from emergency medical services personnel and hospitalization.

Although another analysis of five US studies indicated a higher rate of 26.4%, the better rate still means “that only a quarter of anaphylaxis cases showing up to the emergency department [ED] were treated with epinephrine before EMS attention,” according to Wang.

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Flu Vaccine for People with Egg Allergy

Flu Vaccine for People with Egg Allergy

Having a food allergy means that you’re constantly monitoring not just what you eat but other ways you might come into contact with your allergen. Food preparation, cross contamination, and for people with an egg allergy that includes the flu vaccine. The flu vaccine does contain a small egg protein, so what does that mean if you're allergic to eggs? Is the vaccine safe for you?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) logo

Summary:

CDC and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have not changed their recommendations regarding egg allergy and receipt of influenza (flu) vaccines. The recommendations remain the same as those recommended for the 2018-2019 season. Based on those recommendations, people with egg allergies no longer need to be observed for an allergic reaction for 30 minutes after receiving a flu vaccine. People with a history of egg allergy of any severity should receive any licensed, recommended, and age-appropriate influenza vaccine. Those who have a history of severe allergic reaction to egg (i.e., any symptom other than hives) should be vaccinated in an inpatient or outpatient medical setting (including but not necessarily limited to hospitals, clinics, health departments, and physician offices), under the supervision of a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic conditions.

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Magician Alan Hudson Headlines Action Awards Virtual Celebration

Magician Alan Hudson Headlines Action Awards Virtual Celebration

“Pick a card, any card”

A talented magician amazes their audience by performing feats that leave them asking “how did they do that?” Now, imagine a magician that leaves the audience amazed, while he interacts with them virtually. They’re astonished, looking at their computer screens, all the while still asking “how did they do that?” That talented magician, in fact he’s been on Britain’s Got Talent, is Alan Hudson. World renowned, one of the UK’s top professional magicians. Alan will bring his many talents to our annual Allergy Action Awards Virtual Awards on October 20th.

Alan Hudson's Virtual Magic Show advertisement

September 20th, 2021

Regarding our annual Action Awards Celebration, the Allergy Advocacy Association is delighted to present magician and comedian Alan Hudson as our special guest entertainer for the evening. He will be appearing on our virtual ZOOM broadcast on Wednesday, October 20th at 7pm.

Alan Hudson is one of the UK’s top professional magicians specializing in virtual magic shows online, close up magic and stand-up comedy magic.

Alan is one of Britain’s leading conjurors and highly regarded as one of the top magicians in the UK. He’s a Member of The Inner Magic Circle with Gold Star (less than 250 worldwide) and in 2019 they awarded him The Carlton Comedy Award for outstanding comedy in magic. He’s been on Britain’s Got Talent, ITV’s The Next Great Magician and on ITV’s Penn & Teller: Fool Us.

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Q & A: Which Patients with Food Allergy Are Candidates for Oral Immunotherapy?

Q&A: Which Patients with Food Allergy Are Candidates for Oral Immunotherapy?

If you have a food allergy, how do you handle it? For some it requires developing strategies to avoid potentially life threatening allergens. By working with an allergist, an oral immunotherapy plan (OIT) should be developed. What is an OIT? Does it work for my allergy? Am I a good candidate for OIT? The answer to these and other questions can be found in a Q&A with Douglas H. Jones, MD, cofounder of Global Food Therapy, co-founder and president of Food Allergy Support Team and director of Rocky Mountain Allergy at Tanner Clinic.

Boy holding and looking at an unshelled peanut

By Richard Gawel
By Douglas H. Jones, MD
September 09, 2021

Patients with food allergies can avoid items that may be dangerous — or they can work with an allergist to develop an oral immunotherapy plan that would enable them to safely consume and enjoy previously dangerous foods.

Douglas H. Jones, MD
Douglas H. Jones

Douglas H. Jones, MD, cofounder of Global Food Therapy, cofounder and president of Food Allergy Support Team and director of Rocky Mountain Allergy at Tanner Clinic, discussed factors to consider when determining if a patient with food allergies is a candidate for oral immunotherapy (OIT) during a presentation at Allergy & Asthma Network’s Global Food Allergy Summit. Healio spoke with Jones to find out more.

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