All In!

Doctor, researcher and parent of a child with food allergies, all three roles influence Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH in her work as the founding Director of the Center for Food Allergy & Asthma Research (CFAAR) at Northwestern’s Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM). At CFAAR, she and her team conduct research investigating the causes behind food allergies as well as the possible influences that environment may play. Their work also goes beyond the laboratory. They have engaged the community by co-hosting over 100 “health leader” workshops. These workshops work towards empowering Chicago public high school students to become health advocates through educating their own peers and community members. Learn more about Dr. Gupta and the CFAAR’s vital work here.

All In!

Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH
Photography by MONICA WNUK

Center for Food Allergy & Asthma Research
Director Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, Leads with a Personal Touch

By Gina Bazer
July 27th, 2020

A small comic strip displayed in the office of Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, serves as a sort of mission statement. The first frame shows an adult telling a child, “When I was your age, there were no food allergies.” The next one shows that same child, now grown up, telling a younger kid, “When I was your age, there were food allergies.”

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FDA Turns Down Viaskin Peanut Patch Approval Bid

In developing an adhesive patch treatment, DBV Technologies, believed they found an effective and safe method to provide help to those suffering from peanut allergies. The Food and Drug Administration didn’t agree. The FDA has decided not to approve, at least for now, DBV Technologies’ Viaskin Peanut, a skin patch allergy desensitization treatment. The FDA’s concern appears to be around the issue of adhesion to the skin and its possible impact on treatment. While the FDA’s decision was met with disappointment within the food allergy community and DBV, there continues to be hope that the needed changes can be made, that the FDA will be able to approve and that a new treatment for peanut allergy sufferers will be available.

FDA Turns Down Viaskin Peanut Patch Approval Bid

DBV Technologies Viaskin Peanut patch
Photo: DBV Technologies Viaskin Peanut patch

By: Gwen Smith
August 4, 2020

The FDA says it won’t approve DBV Technologies’ Viaskin Peanut, the novel skin patch allergy desensitization treatment, at least not in its current form.

In announcing the drug regulator’s decision, DBV said in a press release that the FDA raised concerns about Viaskin patch’s adhesion to the skin and the impact of that on treatment. To address the concerns, DBV says the FDA calls for patch modifications, followed by “a new human factor study.”

The company’s leadership vows to comply with the FDA’s requests and move forward. “We are very disappointed in the FDA’s response, but continue to believe in the potential of Viaskin Peanut,” Daniel Tassé, CEO of DBV, said in the August 4 release.

DBV says the FDA also requested further clinical data on chemistry and manufacturing. No safety concerns were raised related to the therapy.

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What the FDA's Relaxed Food Label Rules Mean for People with Allergies

Recently the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued revised guidelines, “relaxing” packaged food labeling requirements. They were concerned about possible supply disruptions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. The result has been confusion, concern and controversy. What do these new guidelines really mean? How do they impact individuals and families with life-threatening food allergies? How can people stay safe and informed? Read what the FDA, consumer groups, and parents have to say.

What the FDA's Relaxed Food Label Rules Mean for People with Allergies

You can read all about this new initiative here.

Young woman looking at items on grocery store shelves

The Agency’s Action Is Alarming Consumers Who Rely on Ingredient Labels to Stay Safe.

By Rachel Rabkin Peachman
July 7th, 2020

To avoid potential food-supply-chain disruptions in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the Food and Drug Administration announced last month that it has temporarily relaxed food labeling guidelines, allowing manufacturers of packaged foods to substitute certain ingredients without changing the labels.

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ARS Pharmaceuticals Announces New Patent on ARS-1 (Epinephrine Nasal Spray)

Epinephrine is the known treatment for anaphylaxis. The way that epinephrine is administered is through injection. That may soon change. ARS Pharmaceuticals has announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued a second key patent for ARS-1, a low dose intranasal epinephrine nasal spray currently in clinical development. Because time is of the essence when an anaphylaxis attack occurs, many believe, as does ASR, an epinephrine nasal spray can be an effective replacement treatment of autoinjectors. A fear of needles or apprehension of operating an auto-injector has been sighted as one of the reasons for the desire for an epinephrine nasal spray.

ARS Pharmaceuticals Announces New Patent on ARS-1 (Epinephrine Nasal Spray)

Neffy Intranasal Epinephrine Device
Neffy Intranasal Epinephrine Device

Patent Approval Covers Fast-acting Decreased Dosage Level for Intranasal Administration for type 1 Allergic Reaction

By News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release
July 13th, 2020
SAN DIEGO –

ARS Pharmaceuticals today announced that on June 16, 2020, the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued a second key patent for ARS-1, a low dose intranasal epinephrine nasal spray currently in clinical development. This dosage is significantly lower than other reported investigational intranasal epinephrine projects in development and thus helps protect against possible accidental overdose risk during a severe allergic reaction. This follows a patent approved last year covering the composition of matter of ARS-1. ARS Pharmaceuticals is dedicated to putting patients first and these ARS-1 innovations are an important step for those with severe allergic reactions to get lifesaving, pain free treatment.

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85 Million Americans Avoid Buying Food with Top 9 Allergens

When you or a family member have a food allergy, putting together the family grocery list isn’t just about who likes or dislikes certain foods. It’s also about foods that can cause a potentially fatal allergic reaction. Knowing what foods to avoid is essential. A new study from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) shows how universal labeling could help consumers. Our association strongly endorses food labeling that clearly lists all ingredients, especially any dangerous allergens.

85 Million Americans Avoid Buying Food with Top 9 Allergens

Bowls, plates and platters containing samples of allergens

By Lana Bandoim
July 6th, 2020

A new study from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) reveals that 85 million Americans avoid buying food with the top nine allergens in it because either they have allergies or members of their households have them. This consumer group spends $19 billion per year on specialty food products without allergens, and FARE believes universal labels would make shopping easier.

According to FARE, the top nine food allergens in the United States are milk, eggs, wheat, sesame, tree nuts, soy, fish, shellfish and peanuts. One out of four Americans or 85 million people avoid purchasing foods with these allergens. However, only an estimated 32 million Americans are at risk of having life-threatening allergic reactions.

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