Survey: Majority Don’t Use Prescribed Epinephrine in Emergency

Many with a severe allergy seem to think that an anaphylaxis reaction only happens to other people. A recent survey of 917 respondents found that 89 percent of the adults surveyed said they filled their prescriptions, but 45 percent said they didn’t have their device during their most severe allergic reaction — despite having had previous medical emergencies. What’s going on? Reasons given for not filling and carrying the prescription were cost, bulkiness, allergy not severe, no history of previous reaction and that they already had one or more. Perhaps we need a public information campaign to remind people to carry their EAI devices at all times.

Survey: Majority Don’t Use Prescribed Epinephrine in Emergency

EpiPen 2-Pak

By Denis Bedoya
June 21, 2018

A majority of people with potentially life-threatening allergies don’t use their epinephrine auto-injectors in an emergency, according to a study.

The results are based upon surveys of 917 people, including 450 adults. The findings were published Thursday in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

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The Bacteria Babies Need

Could the mystery of the cause of allergies be a bacterium that now seems to have disappeared from the guts of infants? Called B. infantis, nine out of 10 American babies don’t harbor this bacterium in their gut as compared to those in less industrialized countries. The cause could be the rise in cesarean births, the overuse of antibiotics or the use of infant formula in place of breast milk. Studies suggest that by the time babies without B. infantis are older, they are more likely to have allergies and Type 1 diabetes — and be overweight.

The Bacteria Babies Need

Abstract Symbolic Bacteria Drawing
Credit: Ariel Davis

By Kristin Lawless
June 17, 2018

We may be missing the key to one of the biggest boons to public health since the introduction of iodine into the food supply in 1924.

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have found that a strain of bacteria called B. infantis that is thought to have been the dominant bacterium in the infant gut for all of human history is disappearing from the Western world. According to their research, this was probably caused by the rise in cesarean births, the overuse of antibiotics and the use of infant formula in place of breast milk.

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BMC Pediatrics Data Shows Concerns about School Labeling of Foods

Dr. Ruchi Gupta, Lurie Childrens Hospital
Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, Lurie Children's Hospital

Dr. Ruchi Gupta of the Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago conducted a survey with parents to ask if they felt their child with food allergies was safe at school. One in five parents surveyed felt they did not. They reported they would like to see epinephrine stocked for use on any child in an emergency, school lunch menus should display allergen information, and ingredient labels on food items are needed. They also wanted to see schools provide more food allergy education for students. Hopefully parents will band together and advocate for improvements.

Study Identifies Key Food Allergy Policies in Schools to Improve Safety of Kids

www.Newswise.com
May 23, 2018

One in five parents did not feel that their child with food allergy was safe while at school, according to results of a national survey published in BMC Pediatrics. While most of the 289 parents surveyed reported that their child’s school had implemented at least one food allergy policy, they felt that more could be done. Nearly 95 percent of the parents surveyed wanted stock epinephrine to be available in school, so that a life-threatening reaction to food could be treated immediately. Most parents also felt that school lunch menus should display allergen information (65 percent reported that this was not done) and that ingredient labels on food items are needed (87 percent reported that ingredient labels were not available). They also wanted to see schools provide more food allergy education for students (72 percent reported no food allergy education for students).

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Allergies More Common in Kids with Autism

As if they don’t have enough to deal with already, a recent study conducted at the University of Iowa found that children with autism are more likely to have a food, respiratory, or skin allergy. The researchers surveyed 200,000 U.S. children between the ages of 3 and 17 in the years between 2007 and 2016 and found that a child with autism might have almost three times the risk of having food allergies. It is also more difficult to diagnose an allergy in kids with autism because many cannot express how they are feeling. Researchers will continue to study possible causes and if the two conditions are somehow related.

Autistc child looking through pane of glass

Allergies More Common in Kids with Autism

By Serena Gordon
June 8, 2018

Children with autism are more likely to also have a food, respiratory or skin allergy, new research suggests.

What's not clear from the new study, however, is whether there's a common cause behind these conditions.

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Patch Progress, Peanut OIT in Adults Data at EAACI Meeting

A Viaskin Patch
Photo: DBV Technologies

The peanut patch and peanut powder for all who are allergic might soon be coming to market! DBV Technologies and Aimmune Therapeutics has developed a patch that slowly exposes the wearer to the peanut allergen to build up tolerance, while Aimmune is working on a peanut powder that patients consume gradually, until they reach a maintenance dose. Both therapies are in Phase 3 clinical trials, and the companies expect to file applications for approval with the FDA by the end of this year.

The other good news is DBV is now working on a “milk” patch.

Patch Progress, Peanut OIT in Adults Data at EAACI Meeting

By Claire Gagné
June 7, 2018

We’re learning more about the two therapies to treat peanut allergies that could soon be available in allergist’s offices in the United States.

DBV Technologies, the makers of the Viaskin peanut patch immunotherapy, and Aimmune Therapeutics, the company behind AR101, a standardized protocol for oral immunotherapy, both presented data at the European Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (EAACI) conference held in Munich in May.

Both therapies are in Phase 3 clinical trials, and the respective companies expect to file applications for approval with the FDA by the end of this year.

With Viaskin, patients are slowly exposed to their allergen through the skin by wearing a patch, building up tolerance. The therapy has been in clinical trials for years, but the company encountered a setback last fall when it announced its Phase 3 trial failed to meet a main statistical goal set out by the FDA. At the time, the company said it believed its product could still help patients, and that the statistical analysis didn’t tell the whole story. It said it would proceed with its plan to get approval.

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