CEO Expects Approval and Launch of Intranasal Emergency Epinephrine Spray by Summer 2023

When anyone has an attack of anaphylaxis, we know that epinephrine is a life-saving treatment. We also know that for a lot of people, “fear of the jab” is one of the things that prevents them from using epinephrine; the medication must be administered by intermuscular injection. By the Summer of 2023, according to the CEO of ARS Pharma Richard Lowenthal, a new method to administer epinephrine may help make that fear obsolete.

CEO Expects Approval and Launch of Intranasal Emergency Epinephrine Spray by Summer 2023

ARS-Pharma Research promo pix

By Dave Bloom
2022/03/02

SnackSafely.com has been following the progress of a number of emergency epinephrine auto-injector alternatives over the years. These provide an alternate means of delivering epinephrine in an anaphylactic emergency to the needle used in traditional auto-injectors like EpiPen and prefilled syringes like Symjepi.

Why is this important? Because a delay in administering epinephrine during anaphylaxis results in poorer outcomes, and “fear of the jab” can sometimes lead people to delay administering the drug. The bulkiness of some brands of auto-injectors can also result in people leaving them at home when they should be carrying two doses with them at all times. 

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‘He started feeling weird’: Wife of Hatboro police officer remembers life together before he was stricken by a bee sting

Ryan Allen is a husband, father, police officer and the tragic victim of a bee sting. That venomous sting set in motion a series of events that now have Ryan residing in hospice care. Here are stories and reflections about Ryan from friends and family who are so proud of him and who love him so very much.

‘He started feeling weird’: Wife of Hatboro police officer remembers life together before he was stricken by a bee sting

Allen family photo
Hatboro police officer Ryan Allen is pictured here with his wife, Whitney Allen, their son, Jackson Allen, and their dog, Louie, at home. Allen is in hospice care after suffering an anaphylactic reaction to a bee sting in October. (Contributed photo)

By ANDREW SCOTT
MAR 11, 2022 

Whitney Allen was pregnant with her second child with Hatboro police officer Ryan Allen last year, looking forward to their life together with the growing family.

Then came Oct. 7.

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Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Valentine’s Day is a day that can be fun, frustrating and maybe a little anxious for parents, and for other folks as well. But if you’re the parent of a child with a life-threatening food allergy it provides additional challenges of finding safe foods for Valentine treats. But no worry, Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have you taken care of with this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide.

Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Snacksafely Valentines Day Treats Guide

Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have published this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide, their extensive catalogs of allergy-friendly foods relied upon by thousands of schools and tens of thousands of families nationwide to help keep allergens out of the home and the classroom.

Each guide is interactive: click any entry to see precisely how that product is manufactured with respect to the 11 allergens we track (peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, crustacean shellfish, sesame, mustard, and gluten) including shared line/facility information you won’t find on the label or anywhere else, as well as links to the product’s store finder, website, and Amazon page.

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Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Having a life-threatening food allergy is scary for anyone, but when you’re the parent of a young child with one, that fear is a constant. A recent NIH funded clinical study examined the impact of peanut oral immunotherapy to children one to three years old who are highly peanut allergic. The results were positive and provide hope for finding additional methods to desensitize young children to peanut allergies.

Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Wesley Burks, MD and Edwin Kim, MD head shots
Wesley Burks, MD, and Edwin Kim, MD

This study, called IMPACT, was co-led by A. Wesley Burks, MD, CEO of UNC Health and dean of the UNC School of Medicine. Edwin Kim, MD, is co-author on the paper and leads peanut allergy research at the UNC School of Medicine.

January 20, 2022

A clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that giving peanut oral immunotherapy to highly peanut-allergic children ages 1 to 3 years safely desensitized most of them to peanut and induced remission of peanut allergy in one-fifth of participants.

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New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

We’ve all spent time looking at the expiration date labels in our fridge and pantry. Sometimes it's apparent that the food in question has gone bad, but sometimes it isn’t. And sometimes the product is fine past the date on the label. The same can be true for prescription drugs. That is the reason that U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) have introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply.

New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

FDA Logo

Reporting by Jon Terry
January 20, 2022

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply. According to the FDA, amending the expiration date of some prescription drugs may alleviate the shortages that the United States currently is facing.

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