ARS Pharmaceuticals Announces New Patent on ARS-1 (Epinephrine Nasal Spray)

Epinephrine is the known treatment for anaphylaxis. The way that epinephrine is administered is through injection. That may soon change. ARS Pharmaceuticals has announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued a second key patent for ARS-1, a low dose intranasal epinephrine nasal spray currently in clinical development. Because time is of the essence when an anaphylaxis attack occurs, many believe, as does ASR, an epinephrine nasal spray can be an effective replacement treatment of autoinjectors. A fear of needles or apprehension of operating an auto-injector has been sighted as one of the reasons for the desire for an epinephrine nasal spray.

ARS Pharmaceuticals Announces New Patent on ARS-1 (Epinephrine Nasal Spray)

Neffy Intranasal Epinephrine Device
Neffy Intranasal Epinephrine Device

Patent Approval Covers Fast-acting Decreased Dosage Level for Intranasal Administration for type 1 Allergic Reaction

By News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release
July 13th, 2020
SAN DIEGO –

ARS Pharmaceuticals today announced that on June 16, 2020, the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued a second key patent for ARS-1, a low dose intranasal epinephrine nasal spray currently in clinical development. This dosage is significantly lower than other reported investigational intranasal epinephrine projects in development and thus helps protect against possible accidental overdose risk during a severe allergic reaction. This follows a patent approved last year covering the composition of matter of ARS-1. ARS Pharmaceuticals is dedicated to putting patients first and these ARS-1 innovations are an important step for those with severe allergic reactions to get lifesaving, pain free treatment.

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What the FDA's Relaxed Food Label Rules Mean for People with Allergies

Recently the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued revised guidelines, “relaxing” packaged food labeling requirements. They were concerned about possible supply disruptions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. The result has been confusion, concern and controversy. What do these new guidelines really mean? How do they impact individuals and families with life-threatening food allergies? How can people stay safe and informed? Read what the FDA, consumer groups, and parents have to say.

What the FDA's Relaxed Food Label Rules Mean for People with Allergies

You can read all about this new initiative here.

Young woman looking at items on grocery store shelves

The Agency’s Action Is Alarming Consumers Who Rely on Ingredient Labels to Stay Safe.

By Rachel Rabkin Peachman
July 7th, 2020

To avoid potential food-supply-chain disruptions in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the Food and Drug Administration announced last month that it has temporarily relaxed food labeling guidelines, allowing manufacturers of packaged foods to substitute certain ingredients without changing the labels.

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FDA’s Revised Glove Guidelines Impact People with Latex Allergy

When you have a potentially life-threatening allergy, you must be vigilant. Accidental exposure to an allergen might be fatal. If you are a health care professional and have a latex allergy, the recent updated glove use guidelines issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has made that vigilance even more challenging. By relaxing the guidelines, the FDA may have created an environment where there are more latex proteins in a healthcare setting.

FDA’s Revised Glove Guidelines Impact People with Latex Allergy

A Medical Person Putting on Latex Gloves

Reporting courtesy of the Allergy and Asthma Network
June 19th, 2020

In March, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated its glove use guidelines for healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. These guidelines, however, loosen latex allergy standards and may potentially put people with latex allergy at risk.

The guidelines include no precautions or education for latex allergy patients and there is no latex warning required on glove labels. The action also suggests that healthcare professionals can extend use of medical gloves between patients, a poor use of glove practice. As a result of these guidelines, latex proteins may now be more present in healthcare settings.

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85 Million Americans Avoid Buying Food with Top 9 Allergens

When you or a family member have a food allergy, putting together the family grocery list isn’t just about who likes or dislikes certain foods. It’s also about foods that can cause a potentially fatal allergic reaction. Knowing what foods to avoid is essential. A new study from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) shows how universal labeling could help consumers. Our association strongly endorses food labeling that clearly lists all ingredients, especially any dangerous allergens.

85 Million Americans Avoid Buying Food with Top 9 Allergens

Bowls, plates and platters containing samples of allergens

By Lana Bandoim
July 6th, 2020

A new study from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) reveals that 85 million Americans avoid buying food with the top nine allergens in it because either they have allergies or members of their households have them. This consumer group spends $19 billion per year on specialty food products without allergens, and FARE believes universal labels would make shopping easier.

According to FARE, the top nine food allergens in the United States are milk, eggs, wheat, sesame, tree nuts, soy, fish, shellfish and peanuts. One out of four Americans or 85 million people avoid purchasing foods with these allergens. However, only an estimated 32 million Americans are at risk of having life-threatening allergic reactions.

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Pandemic Jolts Federal Policy for Food Labeling

Because of the coronavirus, the Food and Drug Administration has recently issued interim food labeling guidelines, in response to possible supply chain issues and shortages. These guidelines created confusion as to “what’s in, what’s out and what’s new” in food products. As a result, there have been responses and reactions from throughout the food allergy community. From petitions to letters, from comments to FDA to calls for clarity regarding these guidelines, our community has been vocal in response to these changes. And the FDA heard us. The FDA has developed a FAQ page and provided additional guidance to help clarify its new guidelines.

Pandemic Jolts Federal Policy for Food Labeling

Logos of the Coalition to Lobby the FDA for Public Guidelines

Reporting by Patrick Morris
June 20, 2020

If you suffer from a food allergy, a food’s product label is essential reading. It can help determine what foods are safe to eat and which are not. Because of the coronavirus, the FDA recently has issued interim food labeling guidelines, in response to possible supply chain issues and shortages. These changes produced confusion and frustration among numerous allergy suffers. The Allergy Advocacy Association, working with other members of the food allergy community, lobbied the FDA about the possible impact these label guideline changes could have. To provide a better understanding of these interim requirements the FDA has developed a FAQ page.

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