‘Most People’ Find Allergen Labels Unclear as Precautionary Labelling Spreads Confusion

Have you ever read a food label, looking for information on potential allergens and weren’t sure what was and wasn’t in the item? You’re not alone and if you suffer from a life threatening allergy, that confusion could be deadly. A new study showed that less than half people found the messaging clear when it came to allergens on food labels. The importance of accurate and clear food labeling is essential to helping those with allergies navigate their food choices and to staying safe.

‘Most People’ Find Allergen Labels Unclear as Precautionary Labelling Spreads Confusion

Mother and little girl - food allergin label confusion

Katy Askew
28-Jul-2021

As a new study reveals, the majority of people find allergen labels confusing. What's the problem and what should be done?

When researchers from The Netherlands evaluated consumer understanding of allergy information on food labels, less than half of people found the messaging clear.

The study, published in journal Clinical & Experimental Allergy, involved two separate experiments with a total of 96 consumers with food allergies and 105 without.

Investigators first randomly presented 18 different food products with labels suggesting peanut was, may be, or was not an ingredient. They then presented three different formats of information: 'Produced in a Factory' and 'May contain' or 'Traces of'.

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Intranasal Delivery of Emergency Epinephrine Takes Another Step Toward Realization

Concerning anaphylaxis emergencies and epinephrine, imagine if an "Epi nasal spray" became a viable treatment option instead of an intermuscular EAI injection device. It might happen sooner that you might think; new devices are being developed that don't require using a needle. And some of them do look very promising.

Intranasal Delivery of Emergency Epinephrine Takes Another Step Toward Realization

Intranasal Epi device

Dave Bloom By Dave Bloom
2021/07/07

We’ve been following the progress of ARS Pharma’s and Bryn Pharma’s intranasal emergency epinephrine devices as they make their way through clinical trials. These devices are meant to provide a needle-free alternative to today’s auto-injectors for the treatment of anaphylaxis.

Now, yet another company is reporting promising results in the race to bring an intranasal device to market, although this one does so differently.

Nasus Pharma based in Tel Aviv is reporting positive results from a pilot study of their FMXIN002 candidate. Unlike the other devices, this device stores and delivers epinephrine in powder form.

According to Nasus, the pilot study is the first human study of powder epinephrine and provides additional compelling evidence to the robustness of their intranasal powder technology in addition to the recently published results of their intranasal naloxone study.

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Bee Sting Treatments: What to Know, and When to See a Doctor

With Springs' arrival, certain things occur. The days get longer, our winter sweaters go back in storage and the bees arrive. And with their arrival comes the inevitable bee sting. Never pleasant and sometimes fatal, what do you do when you or a loved one gets stung? Now we have the opportunity to not understand what happens when we get stung, but what to do about it, if you’re not allergic and when you are.

Bee Sting Treatments: What to Know, and When to See a Doctor

Bee Sting Article Illustration

Most bee stings can be treated at home, but some call for urgent care. Here's how to tell the difference.

Lauren Krouse
May 25, 2021

When spring arrives, the low sound of buzzing nearby serves as a gentle warning that it's best to keep your distance to avoid a bee sting.

For the most part, many of us can make it through the summer without angering our insect neighbors, but bee stings still happen. And whether you've bumped into a stinger yourself or suddenly have a crying child (or partner) on your hands, it helps to know the best bee sting treatments.

Thankfully, they're typically easy to treat. But if you've got a bee sting allergy, it's important to get the proper medical care fast. Here's everything you need to know about how to treat bee stings, plus when to contact a doctor.

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Keven Moore: My near death experience with a peanut allergy shared so you understand the gravity

A life threatening allergy is just that, life threatening. For individuals that have them and their loved ones, a state of hyper vigilance is a constant. From diligently examining food labels. to concerns about cross contamination in restaurants, these individuals strive to stay safe. But sometimes an anaphylaxis reaction occurs. Here Kevin Moore has shared his near death experiences caused by his peanut allergy. He helps us understand what it is like to experience an anaphylaxis attack and in doing so provides us the incentive to become hyper vigilant as we strive in helping those suffering from life threatening allergies.

Keven Moore: My near death experience with a peanut allergy shared so you understand the gravity

Emergency Sign

By Keven Moore
May 20th, 2021

-published by the North Kentucky Tribune-

As a safety and risk management professional, I have a confession to make. I have had a total of five workers’ compensation claims in my lifetime. Yes, five. One minor laceration that required three stitches during my teenage years at McDonald’s, a twisted ankle at UPS, and one broken rib from an altercation trying to stop a shoplifter at McAlpin’s all while I was in school.

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Bone Marrow Disorder Nearly 10-Times More Common in Those with Venom Allergy

People with venom allergies are more likely to suffer mastocytosis, a bone marrow disorder that causes higher risk of fatal reactions according to a study conducted by researchers at Michigan Medicine. This was the nation’s largest study of allergies to bee and wasp stings or hymenoptera venom with over 26 million United States patients examined by the team of allergists utilizing data through an insurance database. A life-threatening reaction to a bee sting can often be the first manifestation of mastocytosis. It’s the most common anaphylaxis trigger in that patient population.

Bone Marrow Disorder Nearly 10-Times More Common in Those with Venom Allergy

Bee and Blue Flowers Blooming with Young Boy

It started as a quality assurance project by allergy residents. It became the most comprehensive venom allergy study in the country.

-from the University of Michigan health blog
www.uofmhealth.org

June 1st, 2021

Researchers at Michigan Medicine found that people with venom allergies are much more likely to suffer mastocytosis, a bone marrow disorder that causes higher risk of fatal reactions.

The team of allergists examined approximately 27 million United States patients through an insurance database – easily becoming the nation’s largest study of allergies to bee and wasp stings, or hymenoptera venom. The results, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, revealed mastocytosis in fewer than 0.1% of venom allergy patients – still near 10 times higher than those without allergies.

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