Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Having a life-threatening food allergy is scary for anyone, but when you’re the parent of a young child with one, that fear is a constant. A recent NIH funded clinical study examined the impact of peanut oral immunotherapy to children one to three years old who are highly peanut allergic. The results were positive and provide hope for finding additional methods to desensitize young children to peanut allergies.

Oral Immunotherapy Alleviates Peanut Allergy in Some Young Children

Wesley Burks, MD and Edwin Kim, MD head shots
Wesley Burks, MD, and Edwin Kim, MD

This study, called IMPACT, was co-led by A. Wesley Burks, MD, CEO of UNC Health and dean of the UNC School of Medicine. Edwin Kim, MD, is co-author on the paper and leads peanut allergy research at the UNC School of Medicine.

January 20, 2022

A clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that giving peanut oral immunotherapy to highly peanut-allergic children ages 1 to 3 years safely desensitized most of them to peanut and induced remission of peanut allergy in one-fifth of participants.

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Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Valentine’s Day is a day that can be fun, frustrating and maybe a little anxious for parents, and for other folks as well. But if you’re the parent of a child with a life-threatening food allergy it provides additional challenges of finding safe foods for Valentine treats. But no worry, Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have you taken care of with this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide.

Announcing 2022 Valentine’s Safe Snack Guide

Snacksafely Valentines Day Treats Guide

Dave Bloom and snacksafely.com have published this year’s Valentine’s Editions of the Safe Snack Guide, their extensive catalogs of allergy-friendly foods relied upon by thousands of schools and tens of thousands of families nationwide to help keep allergens out of the home and the classroom.

Each guide is interactive: click any entry to see precisely how that product is manufactured with respect to the 11 allergens we track (peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, crustacean shellfish, sesame, mustard, and gluten) including shared line/facility information you won’t find on the label or anywhere else, as well as links to the product’s store finder, website, and Amazon page.

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Here’s wishing everyone a “NORMAL” New Year???

Here’s wishing everyone a “NORMAL” New Year???

The holiday season often brings with it a reflection of the past year. Its highs, its lows, the challenges that we may have encountered and our hopes for the impending new year. Here Allergy Advocacy Association co-founder Jon Terry reflects upon this past year and offers his best wishes for a “normal” new year.

Staff of Allergy Advocacy Association. And Warm Holiday Wishes

By Jon Terry
December 6th, 2021

Greetings. As the holiday season begins, I sincerely hope you and your families are healthy and safe.

“Mom? What is…NORMAL?”
“It’s just a setting on the clothes dryer, honey.”

Looking back upon 2021, here in New York State I kept hoping and praying for a return to "NORMAL." I mean “NORMAL” from my own very personal perspective; of course, everyone has their own point of view and certainly yours will be a lot different from mine. Day after day, however, I didn't see much of anything resembling "NORMAL" happening all around me.

Just like everyone else the pandemic has changed so many different parts of my life: 

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New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

We’ve all spent time looking at the expiration date labels in our fridge and pantry. Sometimes it's apparent that the food in question has gone bad, but sometimes it isn’t. And sometimes the product is fine past the date on the label. The same can be true for prescription drugs. That is the reason that U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) have introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply.

New Bill to Address Prescription Drug Shortages

FDA Logo

Reporting by Jon Terry
January 20, 2022

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced the Drug Shortages Shelf-Life Extension Act, a bipartisan bill that would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to extend the shelf life of prescription drugs in scarce supply. According to the FDA, amending the expiration date of some prescription drugs may alleviate the shortages that the United States currently is facing.

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Shazhad Mustafa, MD: Advancing Pediatric Peanut Allergy Management

If you are the parent of a child with a peanut allergy, you understand the challenges of both educating your child and being vigilant in avoiding contact with peanuts, or products that include peanuts. Both the challenges and means to decrease peanut sensitivity were topics at a recent Annual Scientific Meeting meeting of the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology (ACAAI). Included were discussions of Palforzia, a treatment option intended to decrease sensitivity to peanuts over time in pediatric populations.

Syed Shahzad Mustafa, MD, the University of Rochester Medicine and Dentistry, spoke with HPCLive regarding some of the data presented at ACAAI, as well as what physicians and caregivers could do to aid in the adoption of Palforzia therapy.

Shazhad Mustafa, MD: Advancing Pediatric Peanut Allergy Management

November 11, 2021
Armand Butera

Dr. S. Shazad Mustafa speaks on new data related to peanut allergy and Palforzia therapy that were presented at the most recent ACAAI session.

Syed Mustafa, MD

This past weekend, Aimmune Therapeutics presented new data at the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting that detailed the burden of peanut allergy (PA) in affected patients, as well as real-world experiences with Palforzia, a treatment option intended to decrease sensitivity to peanuts over time in pediatric populations.

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