Latex Allergy Awareness Week Set for October 7-13

Latex Allergy Awareness Week Set for October 7-13

Perhaps you’ve seen signs in schools saying “no latex allowed” which of course would include balloons. Allergies to latex can be very serious, so the Allergy & Asthma Network is designating Oct. 7-13 as Latex Allergy Awareness Week. In addition to providing educational resources, the Network is hosting a webinar on Oct. 11, 2018 at 4 p.m. EST. Called “Latex Allergy Myths & Truths: What the Evidence Reveals,” it will feature board-certified allergist and latex allergy expert Kevin Kelly, MD, of North Carolina Children’s Hospital.


VIENNA, VA (August 31, 2018) – Allergy & Asthma Network announces Latex Allergy Awareness Week is Sunday, Oct. 7 to Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018. The theme this year is “Latex Allergy Myths & Truths: What the Evidence Reveals.”

AllergyAsthmaNetwork Logo 285x168During Latex Allergy Awareness Week, the Network raises awareness about the condition, which affects 1 to 6 percent of the population, and distributes educational resources in print and online. The week is intended to highlight the many issues facing people with latex allergy as well as encourage doctors and patients to stay vigilant in efforts to fully understand the condition and eliminate exposure to latex everywhere.

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Opinion: Airlines Need to Get Serious About Food Allergies and In-Flight Auto-Injectors

This is a very frightening article on what could happen to someone experiencing anaphylaxis on an airplane flight. If you have a known food allergy you most likely carry your own epinephrine auto-injector device, but if it’s a first time allergic reaction you will have to hope someone on the plane has one and will lend it to you. Otherwise there would need to be a doctor or nurse on the plane who knows how to administer epinephrine with a vial and syringe, and as this article testifies, even allergists were unsure of what the dosage should be according to someone’s age. We are all for efforts to require airlines to stock EAI devices just like they do automatic electronic defibrillators (AED).

Opinion: Airlines Need to Get Serious About Food Allergies and In-Flight Auto-Injectors

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Nurse Kellie Hopkins stepped in to give Luca an auto-injection during his in-flight emergency. Photo: Francine Ingrassia

By Lianne Mandelbaum
July 24, 2018
This article is from the Summer 2018 Allergic Living magazine.

Kellie Hopkins was buckled in for the plane ride on February 27 and about to watch a movie when she heard the public address announcement; the flight crew were asking for help from a medical professional.

Hopkins, a nurse, rushed from her seat and was soon attending to Luca, a 10-year-old from New York City, who had eaten one cashew. Though his mom, Francine Ingrassia, had never known her son to have a food allergy, Luca quickly began to experience chest pain, stomach pain and increased difficulty breathing.

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Coach of NFL Buffalo Bills Raises Food Allergy Awareness

It’s always nice when an NFL head coach takes time from his busy schedule to help bring attention to food allergies. Last year the NFL had a “My Cause, My Cleats” program where players and coaches customized a pair of sneakers to bring attention to a cause. Coach Sean McDermott of the Buffalo Bills chose food allergies on behalf of his children, and eight-year old allergy-sufferer Jared Saiontz wrote to thank him. Jared had the thrill of his life when he was invited to the Bills’ training camp at St. John Fisher and met Coach McDermott as well as owner Terry Pegula and several players. Thanks Jared and Coach McDermott for bringing attention to this important cause!

Coach of NFL Buffalo Bills Raises Food Allergy Awareness

Left to right: Terry Pegula, Jared Saiontz, Sean McDermott
L-R: Terry Pegula, Jared Saiontz, Sean McDermott

By Claire Carpenter
July 27th, 2018

McDermott inspires young fan

For the NFL’s “My Cause, My Cleats” initiative last season, Bills Head Coach Sean McDermott sought to raise awareness for food allergies - a cause that hits home for him and his family. To show his support, McDermott customized his own pair of sneakers, hoping to make a difference by advancing the conversation. While he may not have known it at the time, McDermott achieved that and much more. 

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FDA Approves First Generic Epi-Pen(TM) in Blow to Mylan

At long last, a potentially less expensive epinephrine auto-injector (EAI) device may be available to consumers very soon. TEVA Pharmaceuticals has received US government approval for a generic version of the Epi-PenTM originally made and marketed by Mylan Pharmaceuticals. Additional generic devices are on their way as well. The existing market for EAI devices is very large; different brands competing against each other could lead to lower prices. Our association fully supports any and all efforts aimed at better regulating healthcare costs for all Americans.

FDA Approves First Generic Epi-PenTM in Blow to Mylan

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TEVA Antares VibexTM epinephrine auto-injector device

FDA Approves TEVA Generic Version of the Epi-PenTM

By Nathan Bomey
USA TODAY
Aug. 16, 2018

The EpiPen is getting a fresh dose of competition.

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved what it described as the first official generic version of the EpiPen, a life-saving treatment for severe allergic reactions.

The generic device's seller, Teva Pharmaceuticals, is a rival to drug maker Mylan's brand-name version.

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What to Do When You're Stung

Honey Bee on Fingers

What to Do When You're Stung

Many children do not realize they are allergic to bee stings until they get stung for the first time, while many adults have been stung before and suddenly become deathly allergic. With over 50 deaths a year in the U.S. due to anaphylaxis from insect stings, this important article describes what to do for any sort of insect bite. MRSA, a strain of staph bacteria, can also be a big concern. You can read the full article here.

Bees, wasps, and hornets: How to treat normal bites

Jul 3, 2018

Summertime means more time outdoors, where you may suffer many types of stings — mosquito bites, wasp bites, bee stings, spider bites, tick bites, or fire ant bites. While most consider insect bites a minor annoyance, they are life-threatening to the two million Americans allergic to their venom. In fact, there are at least 50 deaths each year in the U.S. because of allergic reactions from insect stings. And people who have suffered an allergic reaction have a 60 percent chance of a similar or worse reaction if stung again.

So how should you react to an insect sting?

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