E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

June 2021 e-news issue

Greetings! Summer is upon us. And though it doesn’t officially arrive till June 21st, so much of what Summer brings us is already here. Warmer weather, longer days to enjoy getting outside, and bugs, insects and bees. All of which can be found in our state parks and forests. In this issue you’ll learn about how New York State has just made it easier for park police, forest rangers and Department of Environmental Conservation police to carry life saving epinephrine. You’ll hear the powerful account of what it’s like to suffer a life threatening anaphylaxis attack. You can read about bee stings, what happens to you when you get stung, and what to do if you're allergic and if you’re not. Finally there is a story about research connecting a bone marrow disorder and venom allergies.

ANNOUNCING: Anaphylaxis Emergency Training direct from the internet into your home or office!

Our Epi Near You NY anaphylaxis emergency training program is now VIRTUAL! We will broadcast our next seminar via our website. And please stay tuned to our website to learn more about our next training date.

Our association would help provide:

  • Free state approved training presentation
  • New York State recognized certification
  • Assistance for public entities to obtain a non-patient specific prescription for emergency epinephrine

Best wishes!

Terry, co-founder
Allergy Advocacy Association

Legislature Passes Tedisco, Santabarbara Bill to Enable State Park Rangers, Park Police to Carry Epi-Pens(c) to Help Save Lives

New York State has some of the greatest parks in the nation. And as we continue to emerge from our post pandemic world, New Yorkers could be utilizing our parks in record numbers. And with park recreation comes insect and bug bites. For most these are annoyances but for some, these stings and bites could be life threatening. Fortunately, a recently passed law has given our park rangers, forest rangers and environmental police the opportunity to provide life saving epinephrine to those in need. Our association is very grateful to lawmakers and activist advocates who made passage happen. Now it's up to the Governor of New York State to sign and enact this bill as soon as possible.

Legislature Passes Tedisco, Santabarbara Bill to Enable State Park Rangers, Park Police to Carry Epi-Pens(c) to Help Save Lives

New York State Senators Tedisco and Santabarbara Celebraate EAI Bill Passage

James Tedisco
May 26, 2021

Tedisco and Santabarbara’s legislation adds park & forest rangers, environmental conservation police, who are first to respond to emergencies in parks, to long list of professionals who can treat those with severe, life-threatening allergic reactions.

In advance of the busy Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial kick-off of summer as millions of New Yorkers head outdoors to our state parks, the New York State Legislature has given final passage to a new bi-partisan law sponsored by Senator Jim Tedisco (R,C-Glenville) and Assemblyman Angelo Santabarbara (D,C-Rotterdam) to help save lives by enabling forest and state park rangers to carry EpiPens to treat people with severe allergic reactions in an emergency.

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Keven Moore: My near death experience with a peanut allergy shared so you understand the gravity

A life threatening allergy is just that, life threatening. For individuals that have them and their loved ones, a state of hyper vigilance is a constant. From diligently examining food labels. to concerns about cross contamination in restaurants, these individuals strive to stay safe. But sometimes an anaphylaxis reaction occurs. Here Kevin Moore has shared his near death experiences caused by his peanut allergy. He helps us understand what it is like to experience an anaphylaxis attack and in doing so provides us the incentive to become hyper vigilant as we strive in helping those suffering from life threatening allergies.

Keven Moore: My near death experience with a peanut allergy shared so you understand the gravity

Emergency Sign

By Keven Moore
May 20th, 2021

-published by the North Kentucky Tribune-

As a safety and risk management professional, I have a confession to make. I have had a total of five workers’ compensation claims in my lifetime. Yes, five. One minor laceration that required three stitches during my teenage years at McDonald’s, a twisted ankle at UPS, and one broken rib from an altercation trying to stop a shoplifter at McAlpin’s all while I was in school.

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Bee Sting Treatments: What to Know, and When to See a Doctor

With Springs' arrival, certain things occur. The days get longer, our winter sweaters go back in storage and the bees arrive. And with their arrival comes the inevitable bee sting. Never pleasant and sometimes fatal, what do you do when you or a loved one gets stung? Now we have the opportunity to not understand what happens when we get stung, but what to do about it, if you’re not allergic and when you are.

Bee Sting Treatments: What to Know, and When to See a Doctor

Bee Sting Article Illustration

Most bee stings can be treated at home, but some call for urgent care. Here's how to tell the difference.

Lauren Krouse
May 25, 2021

When spring arrives, the low sound of buzzing nearby serves as a gentle warning that it's best to keep your distance to avoid a bee sting.

For the most part, many of us can make it through the summer without angering our insect neighbors, but bee stings still happen. And whether you've bumped into a stinger yourself or suddenly have a crying child (or partner) on your hands, it helps to know the best bee sting treatments.

Thankfully, they're typically easy to treat. But if you've got a bee sting allergy, it's important to get the proper medical care fast. Here's everything you need to know about how to treat bee stings, plus when to contact a doctor.

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Bone Marrow Disorder Nearly 10-Times More Common in Those with Venom Allergy

People with venom allergies are more likely to suffer mastocytosis, a bone marrow disorder that causes higher risk of fatal reactions according to a study conducted by researchers at Michigan Medicine. This was the nation’s largest study of allergies to bee and wasp stings or hymenoptera venom with over 26 million United States patients examined by the team of allergists utilizing data through an insurance database. A life-threatening reaction to a bee sting can often be the first manifestation of mastocytosis. It’s the most common anaphylaxis trigger in that patient population.

Bone Marrow Disorder Nearly 10-Times More Common in Those with Venom Allergy

Bee and Blue Flowers Blooming with Young Boy

It started as a quality assurance project by allergy residents. It became the most comprehensive venom allergy study in the country.

-from the University of Michigan health blog
www.uofmhealth.org

June 1st, 2021

Researchers at Michigan Medicine found that people with venom allergies are much more likely to suffer mastocytosis, a bone marrow disorder that causes higher risk of fatal reactions.

The team of allergists examined approximately 27 million United States patients through an insurance database – easily becoming the nation’s largest study of allergies to bee and wasp stings, or hymenoptera venom. The results, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, revealed mastocytosis in fewer than 0.1% of venom allergy patients – still near 10 times higher than those without allergies.

“Even though there is mounting interest, mast cell diseases are quite understudied; there are probably many people who go through life as some sort of ‘medical mystery,’ unaware of that diagnosis,” says lead investigator Charles Schuler, M.D., a clinical assistant professor of allergy and immunology at Michigan Medicine. “One way to find them is to find people with a venom allergy. This research strongly supports that and will help us more properly treat these patients.”

A life-threatening reaction to a bee sting can often be the first manifestation of mastocytosis. It’s the most common anaphylaxis trigger in that patient population.

While mastocytosis diagnoses are more prevalent in U.S. venom allergy patients, the numbers are significantly higher in Europe, says Cem Akin, M.D., senior author and clinical professor of allergy and immunology at Michigan Medicine.

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