E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

March 2022 e-news Issue

Greetings! We’re now racing to the finish of the NCAA men’s and women’s college basketball tournaments. In this issue of our e-newsletter you can read how a bee sting in 1973 nearly derailed the career of basketball Hall of Famer Bill Walton. Being a parent of a child with a food allergy presents challenges. If they are young and in child-care it can be additional challenging. A new report “Child Care Policies for Food Allergy: Elijah’s Law Report for the U.S. States and Territories provides vital information to help parents.”Fear the Jab" is an expression often used by individuals reluctant to use epinephrine auto injectors. In this issue you can read how that fear may soon be in the past. Ryan Allen is a father, husband, police officer and the victim of a bee sting that set in motion a series of events that now has him in hospice care. Read here not just what happened to him but also the remembrance of friends and family of this remarkable young man.

Concerning our advocacy efforts in New York State, Food Allergy Awareness Day NY will be a virtual event again this year. The date is WEDNESDAY, May 4th starting at 10am. Look for more details in our April e-newsletter. Please register and login via our website.

What is anaphylaxis? How would you recognize an anaphylaxis emergency? And would you know what are the right things to do? For many people, even those that have a life-threatening allergy, the answer is no.

The Allergy Advocacy Association has a solution:
Our Epi Near You NY anaphylaxis emergency training program.
And it's VIRTUAL! Direct from the internet into your home or office!

Our virtual association would help provide: 

  • Free state approved training presentation
  • New York State recognized certification
  • Assistance for public entities to obtain a non-patient specific prescription for emergency epinephrine

For more information, visit our Our Epi Near You NY webpage.

A Summer Trip Took a Near-Fatal Turn for Bill Walton

March Madness! This time of year, college basketball dominates the airwaves as well as so many discussions about which team is up, the biggest upset so far and how well your selection bracket is doing in the office pool. One of the all-time college basketball greats was Bill Walton. Walton also went on to earn several awards during his NBA career, despite having several injuries. A career that almost didn’t occur because of a near fatal bee sting in the Summer of 1973.

A summer trip took a near-fatal turn for Bill Walton

Bill Walton portrait
The first overall pick in the 1974 NBA Draft, Bill Walton had a star-crossed career because of injuries. But it nearly never happened at all.

by Phil Watson
Originally published
December 26, 2021

Article excerpt is reprinted with permission from author Phil Watson and posted on sportscasting.com

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CEO Expects Approval and Launch of Intranasal Emergency Epinephrine Spray by Summer 2023

When anyone has an attack of anaphylaxis, we know that epinephrine is a life-saving treatment. We also know that for a lot of people, “fear of the jab” is one of the things that prevents them from using epinephrine; the medication must be administered by intermuscular injection. By the Summer of 2023, according to the CEO of ARS Pharma Richard Lowenthal, a new method to administer epinephrine may help make that fear obsolete.

CEO Expects Approval and Launch of Intranasal Emergency Epinephrine Spray by Summer 2023

ARS-Pharma Research promo pix

By Dave Bloom
2022/03/02

SnackSafely.com has been following the progress of a number of emergency epinephrine auto-injector alternatives over the years. These provide an alternate means of delivering epinephrine in an anaphylactic emergency to the needle used in traditional auto-injectors like EpiPen and prefilled syringes like Symjepi.

Why is this important? Because a delay in administering epinephrine during anaphylaxis results in poorer outcomes, and “fear of the jab” can sometimes lead people to delay administering the drug. The bulkiness of some brands of auto-injectors can also result in people leaving them at home when they should be carrying two doses with them at all times. 

“Having a non-needle delivery device would help many people overcome that fear and hopefully increase use in anaphylaxis,” said David Stukus, MD, an allergist-immunologist and professor of clinical pediatrics at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio who was not involved with any of the studies of epinephrine alternatives. And “it’s not just food allergy — anaphylaxis can occur from venom stings, medications, or idiopathic causes.”

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New Report Finds Major Gaps in Child Care Policies for Food Allergy Nationwide

Having a food allergy can be difficult and at times very frightening. For the parents of a child with a life-threatening allergy, both are true. Parents are vigilant but can’t be with their children 24/7 to monitor what foods they encounter. Often a child-care facility is the one to do monitoring for a portion of the day. But what is required for this important role? A new report by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) and the Elijah-Alavi Foundation (EAF) titled "Child Care Policies for Food Allergy: Elijah’s Law Report for the U.S. States and Territories compare state-level child care licensing regulations against nine core policy standards that protect children with food allergy in a child care setting.

New Report Finds Major Gaps in Child Care Policies for Food Allergy Nationwide

Elijah Silvera poster

By News Wire ~ 3rd Party Press Release

2022/02/25
The report evaluates child care policies in U.S. states and territories and includes an advocacy toolkit to promote Elijah’s Law to strengthen protections for young children.

Washington, D.C., Feb. 25, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

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‘He started feeling weird’: Wife of Hatboro police officer remembers life together before he was stricken by a bee sting

Ryan Allen is a husband, father, police officer and the tragic victim of a bee sting. That venomous sting set in motion a series of events that now have Ryan residing in hospice care. Here are stories and reflections about Ryan from friends and family who are so proud of him and who love him so very much.

‘He started feeling weird’: Wife of Hatboro police officer remembers life together before he was stricken by a bee sting

Allen family photo
Hatboro police officer Ryan Allen is pictured here with his wife, Whitney Allen, their son, Jackson Allen, and their dog, Louie, at home. Allen is in hospice care after suffering an anaphylactic reaction to a bee sting in October. (Contributed photo)

By ANDREW SCOTT
MAR 11, 2022 

Whitney Allen was pregnant with her second child with Hatboro police officer Ryan Allen last year, looking forward to their life together with the growing family.

Then came Oct. 7.

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