E-Greetings from the Allergy Advocacy Association

October 2019

FARE Teal Pumpkin

Let the holiday season begin! Amidst the lovely autumn foliage, both kids and the young at heart are looking forward to Halloween. But if your children have severe food allergies, it can also be a time of concern. This year the Food Allergy Research & Education group is actively promoting the national Teal Pumpkin Project.

By placing a teal pumpkin on your doorstep, it means you have non-food treats available, such as glow sticks or small toys. This simple act promotes inclusion for trick-or-treaters with food allergies or other conditions. Simply buy a fake teal pumpkin or paint one, and also try to avoid giving out candy with nuts or milk ingredients.

For more details, please visit www.foodallergy.org. Here’s wishing you a very happy and safe Halloween!

Action Awards Gala is BOFFO!!!***

One and all had a fantastic time at the second annual Allergy Action Awards gala. With tables decorated with teal pumpkins, along with raffle baskets and goodie bags, we celebrated those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to help keep our community safe. Read all about our award recipients and how proceeds from the event will help to continue our work on educating the community about what to do if someone is experiencing anaphylaxis. Looking forward to seeing you there next year!

By Suzanne Driscoll
October 27, 2019

The Allergy Advocacy Association Awards Gala was held at ARTISAN Works in Rochester NY on October 10th. Our audience enjoyed fabulous entertainment, food and fun!

Jamie Kosten, the 2019 Ruthie T. Cornell award winner (L)
Brenda Tremblay, Gala MC (R).

We honored Dr. Jeremy Cushman, developer of the Emergency Medical Services' Syringe Epinephrine Kit at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and Jamie Kosten who saved the life of his father, a beekeeper, from a life threatening anaphylaxis response to bee stings.

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At 30,000 Feet, Why We Can’t Count on Epinephrine Vials on an Airplane

One would think that with the frequency of peanuts being handed out on a typical airline flight, that the carriers would certainly have epinephrine on hand. But sadly this is not the case. Federal laws that would require airlines to carry EpiPens failed to pass in 2016 and Airlines for America, the carriers’ trade association, received a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) four-year exemption from carrying drugs such as epinephrine in times of drug shortages. So there is a high probability that you could be left high and dry if you were experiencing signs of anaphylaxis while flying in an airplane. Please contact your congressman to ask for their support in passing a law requiring airlines to carry lifesaving epinephrine.

At 30,000 Feet, Why We Can’t Count on Epinephrine Vials on an Airplane

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(GettyImages)

By: Lianne Mandelbaum
October 10, 2019

Back in 2016, the food allergy community had high hopes for a bipartisan Senate bill that would have required all U.S. airlines to carry epinephrine auto-injectors on every flight, and to train crews to use them. But the proposed law failed to pass.

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The Prevalence of Peanut Allergy Has Trebled in 15 years…

Most of us are certainly aware that the number of people with severe food allergies is increasing rapidly. But there is hope for the future, as an advisory panel at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently voted to approve a new treatment for peanut allergies in children. Called Palforzia, the drug seeks to treat peanut-allergy sufferers by exposing them to increasing amounts of pharmaceutical-grade peanut protein.

But American regulators may soon approve a treatment

Emergency Sign

The Economist
Oct 3rd, 2019

FOOD ALLERGIES have plagued humans for thousands of years. In the fifth century BC Hippocrates noted that although some people could eat their fill of cheese “without the slightest hurt…others come off badly.” The difference, he observed, “lies in the constitution of the body.”

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Mylan to Pay $30 Million for Disclosure and Accounting Failure Relating to Epi-Pen©

There is justice at last, with Mylan, the maker of EpiPens, being fined $30 million for over charging Medicaid by classifying it as a “generic” drug, rather than a branded one. Also, investors were kept in the dark about Mylan’s EpiPen misclassification and the potential loss Mylan faced as a result of the pending investigation.

Mylan to Pay $30 Million for Disclosure and Accounting Failure Relating to Epi-Pen©

Mylan Corporate Headquarters

By News Wire
Washington D.C., Sept. 27, 2019

The Securities and Exchange Commission today announced charges against Pennsylvania-based pharmaceutical company Mylan N.V. for accounting and disclosure failures relating to a Department of Justice (DOJ) probe into whether Mylan overcharged Medicaid by hundreds of millions of dollars for EpiPen, its largest revenue and profit generating product. Mylan agreed to pay $30 million to settle the SEC’s charges.

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